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Results tagged with Search options user 1208

WordPress stores user generated content, along with other configurable information, in a database (typically MySQL).

4
votes
+mysql+database Once things are recovered, run OPTIMIZE TABLE xyz statements on each table, and then alter the engine of the database and each table to make it use InnoDB. InnoDB clutters the catalog … somewhat (especially if you drop a database or large tables), but -- being ACID compliant -- it's a hell of a lot less error prone than MyISAM. …
answered Oct 21 '10 by Denis de Bernardy
1
vote
Depending on what you're looking for, I'd suggest http://hub.org. It's not necessarily the cheapest around, nor does it necessarily have the most cutting edge control panel. But you get a VPS maintain …
answered Dec 12 '10 by Denis de Bernardy
4
votes
At a higher level, there truly isn't any means to know if the php/db connector will return the correct id by relying on $wpdb->insert_id. The only way to be 100% sure is to have add a key you know wil …
answered Nov 30 '10 by Denis de Bernardy
3
votes
You need to tell $wpdb what subscriptions when initializing your plugin: $wpdb->subscriptions = $wpdb->prefix . 'subscriptions';
answered Nov 27 '10 by Denis de Bernardy
3
votes
Your error message means that $wpdb in your code is currently pointing to a null pointer. Either WP is not loaded, or you're missing a simple global $wpdb; statement, or both. If you need to load WP, …
answered Feb 7 '11 by Denis de Bernardy
3
votes
The best way to know which plugin was adding them is to search/grep your installation for occurrences of 'wpAjax' and "wpAjax". If you find none (which is likely, since the oldest is 3 years old) safe …
answered Dec 5 '10 by Denis de Bernardy
4
votes
MyISAM locks the whole page for writes and is not ACID compliant, while InnoDB sticks to locking rows as you point out, and is ACID compliant. This makes it sturdier when you've a lot of writes, as i …
answered Jan 11 '11 by Denis de Bernardy
8
votes
You can check by looking at the size of the rewrite_rules option in the database. If it's small (which I believe it should with this structure), you're not using verbose rules. By contrast, if you see several lines per static page, you're using verbose rules and it's not good. …
answered Oct 29 '10 by Denis de Bernardy
1
vote
ON DUPLICATE KEY UPDATE is one of several MySQL-specific things used by WP. Best I'm aware there is no equivalent in SQL-Server. You'll get a syntax error no matter unless you regexp_replace() every q …
answered Feb 24 '11 by Denis de Bernardy
8
votes
I only took a cursory glance at your code, but you've at least three issues. The first is security related: CREATE TABLE " . $table_name1 . " You never know what kind of garbage your function migh …
answered Nov 20 '10 by Denis de Bernardy
1
vote
No offense, but I think I'm agreeing with a commenter from your other question... You really need to read PHP, MySQL, and regular expression tutorials before you get into any of this. More importantly …
answered Nov 20 '10 by Denis de Bernardy
4
votes
Personally, I use none of them. And an NDB cluster instead. NDB is MySQL's built-in master-master replication engine. The only limitation of NDB in practice is the lack of full text index. But you ca …
answered Oct 13 '10 by Denis de Bernardy
28
votes
Well, if I take the hat of a WP script kiddie, my answer would be: use post_meta, always. However, I happen to know a thing or two about databases, so my answer is: never, ever, ever, use an EAV (aka …
answered Dec 3 '10 by Denis de Bernardy
1
vote
Agreeing with TheDeadMedic... If you use GREATEST(), please do yourself a favor by knowing what you're doing. It returns a bigint when fed ints, and your query doesn't give the resulting column any na …
answered Dec 3 '10 by Denis de Bernardy
1
vote
There's a different posts and comments table per site, so not really. That said, you can and should keep track of blog ids they've commented on in a user meta to speed things up in the first round, a …
answered Nov 12 '10 by Denis de Bernardy

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