3

Basically what I'm asking is, is wp_ajax_nopriv exclusive to non-logged-in users?

Will a wp_ajax_nopriv action fire if a user is logged in?

7

Looking at the WordPress source code, I'd say that wp_ajax_nopriv_* fires only if you're not logged in, and wp_ajax_* fires otherwise.

Here's the relevant bit, in admin-ajax.php, lines 85-115 in version 5.0.3:

if ( is_user_logged_in() ) {
    // If no action is registered, return a Bad Request response.
    if ( ! has_action( 'wp_ajax_' . $_REQUEST['action'] ) ) {
        wp_die( '0', 400 );
    }

    /**
     * Fires authenticated Ajax actions for logged-in users.
     *
     * The dynamic portion of the hook name, `$_REQUEST['action']`,
     * refers to the name of the Ajax action callback being fired.
     *
     * @since 2.1.0
     */
    do_action( 'wp_ajax_' . $_REQUEST['action'] );
} else {
    // If no action is registered, return a Bad Request response.
    if ( ! has_action( 'wp_ajax_nopriv_' . $_REQUEST['action'] ) ) {
        wp_die( '0', 400 );
    }

    /**
     * Fires non-authenticated Ajax actions for logged-out users.
     *
     * The dynamic portion of the hook name, `$_REQUEST['action']`,
     * refers to the name of the Ajax action callback being fired.
     *
     * @since 2.8.0
     */
    do_action( 'wp_ajax_nopriv_' . $_REQUEST['action'] );
}

So, if you're logged in (ie, is_user_logged_in() is true), it runs the wp_ajax_* action(s), otherwise it runs the wp_ajax_nopriv_* actions.

If you want the same action run regardless whether your user is logged in or not, I'd recommend you hook to both wp_ajax_* and wp_ajax_nopriv_*.

|improve this answer|||||
3

As per wp_ajax_(action) codex:

This hook is functionally the same as wp_ajax_(action), except the "nopriv" variant is used for handling AJAX requests from unauthenticated users, i.e. when is_user_logged_in() returns false.

is_user_logged_in() determines whether the current visitor is a logged in user. It will return true if user is logged in, false if not logged in.

|improve this answer|||||

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.