0

Please see my shortcode script below (which is intended to print the next 15 minute time interval, eg if the current time is 9:01pm, it would print 9:15pm).

I have managed to produce the correct output, however because I am echoing the <span id="webinartime"></span> HTML, the dynamic content is showing up at the top of my WordPress content area, not in the location I type the shortcode.

I understand after reading that I need to return my value to get it to appear in the right place... However, returning ends the function, and so I miss out on including the javascript that will ultimately insert my correct time value (the javascript is necessary to retrieve the user's local time).

I'm wondering if there is a way to have two functions in the shortcode, or nest them somehow... change my approach, etc?

<?php
add_shortcode( 'now_plus_15_min', 'now_plus_15_min' );

function now_plus_15_min() {

// get current date & time
$current_date = date('d-M-Y g:i:s A');
$current_time = strtotime($current_date);

// create new date & time that is the nearest next 15 minute interval
$frac = 900;
$r = $current_time % $frac;
$new_time = $current_time + ($frac-$r);
$new_date = date('d-M-Y g:i:s A', $new_time);

// insert HTML which will be later affected by javascript
// this part is the issue! I need to return this, not echo...
// but returning ends the function before javascript can be run...
echo '<span id="webinartime"></span>';
echo "\n";

// Modify the PHP new date & time to match the user's local time
// and insert it into above HTML
echo "<script>
var date = new Date('" . $new_date . " UTC');
var NextWebinarTime = date.toLocaleString();
console.log(NextWebinarTime);
document.getElementById('webinartime').innerHTML = NextWebinarTime;
</script>
";

}
?>
2

What you should do is create a variable to store all of the HTML data you wish to output with your shortcode then use return. Your code would look something like this:

<?php
// insert HTML which will be later affected by javascript
// this part is the issue! I need to return this, not echo...
// but returning ends the function before javascript can be run...
$html_out = '<span id="webinartime"></span>';
$html_out .= "\n";

// Modify the PHP new date & time to match the user's local time
// and insert it into above HTML
$html_out .= "<script>
var date = new Date('" . $new_date . " UTC');
var NextWebinarTime = date.toLocaleString();
console.log(NextWebinarTime);
document.getElementById('webinartime').innerHTML = NextWebinarTime;
</script>
";

return $html_out;

}
?>

However, if you require JavaScript as part of your response the best WordPress practice would be to enqueue the script. You can learn more about that here:

https://developer.wordpress.org/reference/functions/wp_enqueue_script/

Moreover, as another user has already pointed out there is no need to make use of JavaScript for this shortcode. PHP is more than capable of completing all of the required calculations you need to output to the user.

  • Thanks @Jazibobs this makes sense, to return it all at once. Also, I would certainly be glad to perform this all with PHP, but my research so far has indicated that PHP can't be used to get the user's local time, because the server isn't aware of the user's settings in this way? Perhaps you could lead me to discover how I could do this without using JS? I could start a separate question for this, but would appreciate a hint before putting it out there; thanks. :) – Drewdavid Sep 12 '18 at 15:17
  • Also, just want to confirm that this works. However the JS date/time handling makes it hard to format... (which would be nice to use PHP for, heh). – Drewdavid Sep 12 '18 at 15:23
  • Ahh I didn't realise you were working across multiple timezones, in that case JS is probably a sensible option – Jazibobs Sep 15 '18 at 11:56
1

Add ob_start() on top your function and add return ob_get_clean() at the last row of your function.

function this_is_example() {
    ob_start();
    echo "stuff";
    return ob_get_clean();
}
  • Hi thanks. I don't understand enough of the context of this answer to see how this works with my requirements. Perhaps you could include some forms of the question code to see how this would help? – Drewdavid Sep 12 '18 at 15:22
-1

Result of shortcode will appear after entire code of that shortcode is processed.

PHP can do what you are trying to do through javascript as it is just adding information to an element. As both calculations are ready through PHP processing, you can just echo full 'webinartime' element without handing over that job to javascript. From your content where you used the element div or span etc, you can remove from there and let the PHP code display it already filled with the calculations.

Hope I understood your situation right from your description.

  • Thanks @Rajesh. I haven't been able to find a way for the server to detect the user's timezone using PHP, so I was led to a hybrid solution. Could you point me to a resource that I can follow to learn about doing this with only PHP? Because currently my time is returned as GMT without taking the next steps using JS. Thanks! – Drewdavid Sep 12 '18 at 14:59
  • PHP only options detects user timezone from IP address. It would require you to add IP to timezone database or use API of one of such services as mentioned on stackoverflow.com/questions/5203382/… (check Robin's answer). It is discouraging to see that people are giving minus for taking time to help somebody. My answer to you has been given -1 by somebody. – Rajesh Kakkad Sep 14 '18 at 10:52

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.