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I want to delete all posts of a specific post type (in this case "vfb_entry") that are older than 60 days. The cron job should run once a day.

I have the following code but it's not working if I trigger the cron job. However, running only the query in phpMyAdmin returns the correct result. So there must be an issue with the fuction itself.

Can anyone please help?

// Cron Job to Delete VFB Entries older than 60 days
if(!wp_next_scheduled( 'remove_old_vfb_entries')){
    wp_schedule_event(time(), 'daily', 'remove_old_vfb_entries');
}
add_action('remove_old_vfb_entries', 'myd_remove_old_vfb_entries');

// Build the function
function myd_remove_old_vfb_entries(){
global $wpdb;
// Set max post date and post_type name
$date = date("Y-m-d H:i:s", strtotime('-60 days'));
$post_type = 'vfb_entry';

// Build the query 
// Only select VFB Entries from LFG or LFM Form
$query = "
    SELECT $wpdb->posts.ID FROM $wpdb->posts 
    WHERE post_type = '$post_type' 
    AND post_status = 'publish' 
    AND post_date < '$date'
    AND ($wpdb->posts.ID IN (SELECT entry_id FROM wp_postmeta_lfg4 WHERE post_id IS NOT NULL) OR $wpdb->posts.ID IN (SELECT entry_id FROM wp_postmeta_lfm3 WHERE post_id IS NOT NULL))
    ORDER BY post_modified DESC
";
$results = $wpdb->get_results($query);
            foreach($results as $post){
                // Let the WordPress API clean up the entire post trails
                wp_delete_post( $post->ID, true);
          }
}

Edit: Solution without querying my views, just using wp_posts and wp_postmeta and an INNER JOIN below.

  • 1
    Are you sure the wp_cron() job fires at all? Have you checked the server logs? Do you have debugging enabled (logged to a file would be best in this case)? Why are you not using WP_Query? There is no reason at all I can see to order that result set. That part is a waste of resources. – s_ha_dum Jan 5 '16 at 15:21
  • I used this code because I found it as a snippet on the web. I'm not a programer. I just tried to amend where necessary. But the cron job must have been fired, since I used a plugin to fire it and it said, the cron job was successfully triggered. So I remove the ordering, but what do you mean by using WP_Query? Please help. – jackennils Jan 5 '16 at 16:04
  • How about the debugging logs? – s_ha_dum Jan 5 '16 at 16:07
  • I just checked the log and there's an issue in the sql query. The point is, I needed to create a database view in order to filter the correct vfb_entries, since I do only want to delete specific ones. But it seems WP can't access database views. – jackennils Jan 5 '16 at 16:17
  • I don't know about WordPress and views. I've never tried but our query above isn't a "view", nor do I really see why you'd need one to do this. Exactly what is the error, word for word? – s_ha_dum Jan 5 '16 at 16:24
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// Cron Job to Delete VFB Entries older than 60 days
if(!wp_next_scheduled( 'remove_old_vfb_entries')){
    wp_schedule_event(time(), 'daily', 'remove_old_vfb_entries');
}
add_action('remove_old_vfb_entries', 'myd_remove_old_vfb_entries');

// Build the function
function myd_remove_old_vfb_entries(){
global $wpdb;
// Set max post date and post_type name
$date = date("Y-m-d H:i:s", strtotime('-60 days'));
$post_type = 'vfb_entry';

// Build the query 
// Only Delete Entries from Form 5 and 8
$query = "
    SELECT $wpdb->posts.ID FROM $wpdb->posts 
    INNER JOIN $wpdb->postmeta 
      ON $wpdb->posts.ID = $wpdb->postmeta.post_id 
    WHERE post_type = '$post_type' 
    AND post_status = 'publish' 
    AND $wpdb->postmeta.meta_key = '_vfb_form_id' 
    AND ($wpdb->postmeta.meta_value = 5 OR $wpdb->postmeta.meta_value = 8) 
    AND post_date < '$date' 
";
$results = $wpdb->get_results($query);
            foreach($results as $post){
                // Let the WordPress API clean up the entire post trails
                wp_delete_post( $post->ID, true);
          }
}
  • What is this? An answer? If so, please explain it. – fuxia Jan 6 '16 at 18:25
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// add the schedule event if it has been removed 
if( ! wp_next_scheduled( 'mg_remove_old_entries' ) ) {
  wp_schedule_event( time(), 'daily', 'mg_remove_old_entries' ); //run the event daily
}

// action hooked to fired with wordpress cron job
add_action( 'mg_remove_old_entries', 'mg_remove_old_entries' );
function mg_remove_old_entries() {
  $posts = get_posts( [
    'numberposts' => -1,
    'post_type' => 'vfb_entry',
    'date_query' => [
      // get all the posts from the database which are older than 60 days
      'before' => date( "Y-m-d H:i:s", strtotime( '-60 days' ) ),
    ],
  ]);

  if( !empty($posts) ) {
    foreach( $posts as $post ) {
      wp_delete_post( $post->ID ); //remove the post from the database
    }
  }
}

Note: There is no need to run any custom sql query. It would make the query slow and also it is not good for wordpress. Wordpress has already in built functions for everything.

0

I want to delete all posts of a specific post type (in this case "vfb_entry") that are older than 60 days. The cron job should run once a day.

The first step is setting up the cron job. The code in the question is correct for this part, so it's basically copied below.

The second part requires querying the database for a specific post type where the entry is older than 60 days. We can do this with get_posts() and specifying the post_type argument and the date_query argument.

//* If the scheduled event got removed from the cron schedule, re-add it
if( ! wp_next_scheduled( 'wpse_213720_remove_old_entries' ) ) {
  wp_schedule_event( time(), 'daily', 'wpse_213720_remove_old_entries' );
}

//* Add action to hook fired by cron event
add_action( 'wpse_213720_remove_old_entries', 'wpse_213720_remove_old_entries' );
function wpse_213720_remove_old_entries() {
  //* Get all the custom post type entries older than 60 days...
  $posts = get_posts( [
    'numberposts' => -1,
    'post_type' => 'wpse_262471_post_type',
    'date_query' => [
      'before' => date( "Y-m-d H:i:s", strtotime( '-60 days' ) ),
    ],
  ]);
  //* ...and delete them
  array_filter( function( $post ) {
    wp_delete_post( $post->ID );
  }, $posts );
}

The answer above directly queries $wpdb. Using the get_posts() abstraction is better for a variety of reasons including ease-of-reading and future-proofing.

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