4

Let's say this was in my plugin:

class pluginslug_foo {
    public function bar() {
         //stuff
    }
}

and I wanted to make the method bar available for use outside of the plugin, for instance in a theme file so it could be called with pluginslug_bar();.

I tried:

function pluginslug_get_foo() {
      $foo = new pluginslug_foo();
      return $foo;
}
function pluginslug_bar() {
      $bar = $foo->bar;
}

But I got an unknown variable error for $bar when I tried pluginslug_bar(); in my theme:(

6

An alternative way is to use static class methods in plugins, and optionally write functions as alias:

in Plugin:

class Pluginslug_Foo {

    static $foo = 'Bar!';

    public static function bar() {
       return self::$foo;
    }

}

if ( ! function_exists( 'pluginslug_bar' ) ) {
    function pluginslug_bar() {
       echo Pluginslug_Foo::bar();
    }
}

in Theme:

if ( function_exists( 'pluginslug_bar' ) ) {
    pluginslug_bar(); // echo 'Bar!';
}

or

if ( method_exists('Pluginslug_Foo', 'bar' ) ) {
     echo Pluginslug_Foo::bar(); // echo 'Bar!';
}

Of course static methods and variables not always fit the scope, and this is a general theoric example: without know your real scope/code is impossible to say if it's good for you or not.

4

If your aren’t very familiar with PHP, use simple actions and filters in your theme, and register callbacks for those in your plugin class.

A basic example

Plugin

class Plugin_Class
{
    public function __construct()
    {
        $this->register_callbacks();
    }

    protected function register_callbacks()
    {
        add_filter( 'theme_foo', array( $this, 'foo' ) );
        add_action( 'theme_bar', array( $this, 'bar' ) );
    }

    public function foo()
    {
        return 'foo';
    }

    public function bar()
    {
        print 'bar';
    }
}

Theme

$foo = apply_filters( 'theme_foo', FALSE );

if ( $foo )
    echo "foo is $foo";

do_action( 'theme_bar' ); // prints 'bar'
  • Your example does work for me, but only after I add something like $plugin_obj = new Plugin_Class; in the plugin section or theme section. – Daniel Dropik Dec 21 '15 at 14:50
  • @DanielDropik Well, yes, you have to create an object instance of the class, other wise the code is never called. It doesn't have to be a public instance. – fuxia Dec 21 '15 at 19:18
  • Shouldn't the bar() function in your class echo the 'bar' string, not return it? – leemon Aug 19 '16 at 13:01
2

You have made a mistake in your functions. pluginslug_bar function doesn't contain $foo variable, you need to initialize it first:

function pluginslug_get_foo() {
    $foo = new pluginslug_foo();
    return $foo;
}

function pluginslug_bar() {
    $foo = pluginslug_get_foo();
    $bar = $foo->bar();
}

Then in your theme's functions.php file you can call it like this:

if ( function_exists( 'pluginslug_bar' ) ) {
    pluginslug_bar();
}

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.