2 replaced http://stackoverflow.com/ with https://stackoverflow.com/
source | link

Let me give away one of my favourites :-)

// proven local<->live codefork (covers local network testing, i.e. from mobile devices):
$GLOBALS['is_local'] =  
    in_array( $_SERVER['REMOTE_ADDR'], array("127.0.0.1","::1")) || // simple localhost (IPv4 IPv6)
              $_SERVER['HTTP_HOST'] == 'local.workblog'          || // call by local name (adjust)
       substr($_SERVER["REMOTE_ADDR"],0,8) == '192.168.';           // (mobile) device in local network

$table_prefix  = NULL; // ensure scope

if ( $GLOBALS['is_local'] )  // LOCAL fork ------------------------
{
        ....
}
else  // STAGE/LIVE fork -------------------
{

...and then you work your way from there. DB_NAME, DB_USER... table_prefix. Personally I switch on ALTERNATE_WP_CRON on local (to avoid some annoying warningssome annoying warnings), WP_DEBUG of on both (if you're not a developer) or on live-only (if you are), another ini_set('display_errors', '0'); for live could also do good, ant lastly, as mentioned above: WP_HOME and WP_SITEURL to the respective local/actual url.

That pretty much all, nothing left above the classic WordPress 'That's all, stop editing!' line...

The 192.168. part allows you to do some local testing (i.e. from pads or phones) within your local network)

The $GLOBALS['is_local'] can come in handy in your theme development, too, for some extra debug output, etc...

Let me give away one of my favourites :-)

// proven local<->live codefork (covers local network testing, i.e. from mobile devices):
$GLOBALS['is_local'] =  
    in_array( $_SERVER['REMOTE_ADDR'], array("127.0.0.1","::1")) || // simple localhost (IPv4 IPv6)
              $_SERVER['HTTP_HOST'] == 'local.workblog'          || // call by local name (adjust)
       substr($_SERVER["REMOTE_ADDR"],0,8) == '192.168.';           // (mobile) device in local network

$table_prefix  = NULL; // ensure scope

if ( $GLOBALS['is_local'] )  // LOCAL fork ------------------------
{
        ....
}
else  // STAGE/LIVE fork -------------------
{

...and then you work your way from there. DB_NAME, DB_USER... table_prefix. Personally I switch on ALTERNATE_WP_CRON on local (to avoid some annoying warnings), WP_DEBUG of on both (if you're not a developer) or on live-only (if you are), another ini_set('display_errors', '0'); for live could also do good, ant lastly, as mentioned above: WP_HOME and WP_SITEURL to the respective local/actual url.

That pretty much all, nothing left above the classic WordPress 'That's all, stop editing!' line...

The 192.168. part allows you to do some local testing (i.e. from pads or phones) within your local network)

The $GLOBALS['is_local'] can come in handy in your theme development, too, for some extra debug output, etc...

Let me give away one of my favourites :-)

// proven local<->live codefork (covers local network testing, i.e. from mobile devices):
$GLOBALS['is_local'] =  
    in_array( $_SERVER['REMOTE_ADDR'], array("127.0.0.1","::1")) || // simple localhost (IPv4 IPv6)
              $_SERVER['HTTP_HOST'] == 'local.workblog'          || // call by local name (adjust)
       substr($_SERVER["REMOTE_ADDR"],0,8) == '192.168.';           // (mobile) device in local network

$table_prefix  = NULL; // ensure scope

if ( $GLOBALS['is_local'] )  // LOCAL fork ------------------------
{
        ....
}
else  // STAGE/LIVE fork -------------------
{

...and then you work your way from there. DB_NAME, DB_USER... table_prefix. Personally I switch on ALTERNATE_WP_CRON on local (to avoid some annoying warnings), WP_DEBUG of on both (if you're not a developer) or on live-only (if you are), another ini_set('display_errors', '0'); for live could also do good, ant lastly, as mentioned above: WP_HOME and WP_SITEURL to the respective local/actual url.

That pretty much all, nothing left above the classic WordPress 'That's all, stop editing!' line...

The 192.168. part allows you to do some local testing (i.e. from pads or phones) within your local network)

The $GLOBALS['is_local'] can come in handy in your theme development, too, for some extra debug output, etc...

1
source | link

Let me give away one of my favourites :-)

// proven local<->live codefork (covers local network testing, i.e. from mobile devices):
$GLOBALS['is_local'] =  
    in_array( $_SERVER['REMOTE_ADDR'], array("127.0.0.1","::1")) || // simple localhost (IPv4 IPv6)
              $_SERVER['HTTP_HOST'] == 'local.workblog'          || // call by local name (adjust)
       substr($_SERVER["REMOTE_ADDR"],0,8) == '192.168.';           // (mobile) device in local network

$table_prefix  = NULL; // ensure scope

if ( $GLOBALS['is_local'] )  // LOCAL fork ------------------------
{
        ....
}
else  // STAGE/LIVE fork -------------------
{

...and then you work your way from there. DB_NAME, DB_USER... table_prefix. Personally I switch on ALTERNATE_WP_CRON on local (to avoid some annoying warnings), WP_DEBUG of on both (if you're not a developer) or on live-only (if you are), another ini_set('display_errors', '0'); for live could also do good, ant lastly, as mentioned above: WP_HOME and WP_SITEURL to the respective local/actual url.

That pretty much all, nothing left above the classic WordPress 'That's all, stop editing!' line...

The 192.168. part allows you to do some local testing (i.e. from pads or phones) within your local network)

The $GLOBALS['is_local'] can come in handy in your theme development, too, for some extra debug output, etc...