Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

13

WordPress is a singular without plural. A second instance would be a fork that could not use the same name, because the name WordPress is a trademark of the WordPress Foundation. Like Jesus, just more rules. If WordPress had a plural it would be WordPresses, like in mess or mistress. But the prerequisite for that would be that WordPress becomes either a ...


7

Hate to play grammar police here; but using the plural form of WordPress in the example you've given is incorrect. The correct form would be `...WordPress projects...' not '...WordPresses projects...' After all you deal with a couple of WordPress projects, not WordPresses projects.


5

This is irrelevant if you're self-hosting your site. WordPress.com is a free hosting site run by the company Automattic. Since it's run by a private company, they set the rules and restrict advertising. WordPress.org is the homepage of the open source project called WordPress. You can download WordPress from this site and install it on your own server. ...


5

RECOMMENDED: No reference to the_post_thumbnail() was found in the theme. It is recommended that the theme implement this functionality instead of using custom fields for thumbnails. This is because you are not using the_post_thumbnail() in your theme, you are trying to get an image from the post content. This means there is no way for a user to ...


5

One of the main reasons why github support isn't currently offered is so that the development of plugins could be taken over. see: http://make.wordpress.org/plugins/2012/08/18/93/ I imagine emailing the author (cc'ing plugins@wordpress.org) stating your intention to bring the plugin up to date should be enough, if the author does not respond then the ...


4

It will effectively change the ownership, though it will still show up in your profile if your old username is listed as a contributor, and may still show up in your profile if your old username was the creator of the plugin. To fix the second part, email plugins@wordpress.org and Otto42 or I can re-assign it.


4

There are two (2) steps. Add the WordPress.org username of the contributor you want to add to the "contributors" line in the header info of the Readme file, and that person will have SVN commit access to the plugin. Go to the plugin repository and log in with the main account Go to your plug-in and click the "admin" tab Add the user's WordPress login ...


4

This is because you directly call a PHP file from within your plugin folder. This is bad for two reasons, the first being that some people block direct access to PHP files inside the wp-content folder. The second is you need to include wp-load.php to access the WordPress API. Instead of linking to… ...


4

It is read from the infos on your plugins readme.txt. Example from my Default Values for Attachments === Plugin Name === Contributors: moraleida.me Donate link: http://moraleida.me/ Tags: attachments, default values, caption, title, description Requires at least: 2.5 Tested up to: 3.3.2 Stable tag: 0.1 License: GPLv2 or later ...


4

Yap, it's actually a bit tricky, because there's NO direct link saying "Upload" in WordPress.org. But there is a way: You have to have a WordPress.org account first. After login with the account, look at the left panel, where resides a link saying: "Theme Authors" under "Themes" main menu. Click on it, and it'll direct you to the theme upload page: ...


3

You can try out the api.wordpress.org. Take for example the secret MP6 plugin: http://api.wordpress.org/plugins/info/1.0/mp6.xml The current version is given by: <version type="string"> <![CDATA[ 0.8 ]]> </version> and it looks like the previous versions are listed in the compatibility tag: <compatibility type="array"> ...


3

I would not take the plugin over, I would do an SVN fork and begin maintenance of the plugin yourself. This way, the plugin is now yours, and you are responsible for everything forward on the initial SVN fork. Dealing with legacy issues (the developer was not good at support, etc) probably isn't the best solution.


3

Colloquially, this is definitely meta, but whether it is in stackexchange technical terms, I don't have an opinion on. As for the actual question, I'd say it's "WordPresses". I have never given this consideration when it comes to WordPress, but if you'd check "press (noun)" in a dictionary, it should give you "presses" as a plural. And if that's the case, ...


3

Calls from core to api.wordpress.org (wp 3.2.1) From the phpDoc blocks: Inside head of wp_update_themes(): "A list of all themes installed in sent to WP." Themes /wp-includes/update.php > line 261-267, called on line 280 [1]. Plugins /wp-includes/update.php > line 166-172, called on line 184 Core /wp-includes/update.php > starting on line ...


3

To answer your questions: the wp-config.php is wordpress setting file. how to alter my custom theme? you don't need to alter your theme, its simply telling you to turn debug to true within wp-config.php and review your theme, to see if it creating any warnings or errors. put this line define('WP_DEBUG', true); in your wp-config.php and play around ...


2

I've been trying to work out the issue for months now, and have made several adjustments to try to solve the problem. In short: Yes, we know there's a problem. No, I don't know how to fix it yet. You can stop reporting it already. Current workaround: ANY commit of any kind should trigger it to update. So simply adding a space to the readme.txt and waiting ...


2

Wordpress.com is a hosted blogging service based, of course, on Wordpress. You can register and open your blog, choosing from a variety of themes. It's running the latest version of WordPress. Wordpress.org is the site where you can download WordPress, themes and plugins and install it in your own server.


2

If you release your plugin with the SWFs embedded, they do in fact need to be released under a GPL-compatible license. This means you need to make the original source for the SWFs available, but not necessarily in the plugin itself. You have two options: The WordPress Way When WordPress includes a third-party tool or library that's compiled or minified ...


2

What is the correct process to bring an old or possibly abandoned plugin current? While things could always change in the future (and some change is inevitable, now that the community seems to have gained traction toward the effort to clean up/improve the Plugin repository), currently the recommended approach is to fork the abandoned plugin, so that you ...


2

The favorited plugins has been added to the WordPress.org API. There is a new feature in 3.5 that allows you to access your favorites from the plugin installer. See http://core.trac.wordpress.org/ticket/22002 for info on how it is being used in core. The API allows you to retrieve an object that contains contains each plugins name description author ...


2

The current procedure is for plugin's code to be reviewed for approval: what you can do is to make sure you provided complete and working code what you can hope for, is that reviewers (unpaid volunteer reviewers by the way) are not busy with something else at the moment So essentially it is as long as it takes. Pro tip - plugins from known (in a good ...


2

Here is one idea: You always have the possibility to scrape the plugin's download html page: http://wordpress.org/extend/plugins/some-plugin-slug/stats/ while you don't have any json/xml/rss sources with the today's download counter. The html part you are interested in has this form: <div id="history" class="left"> <h4>History</h4> ...


1

The API does not seem to provide this info. The two datasets you can grab for plugins are: http://api.wordpress.org/plugins/info/1.0/[plugin name] This will return total downloads, not per day. http://api.wordpress.org/stats/plugin/1.0/[plugin name] This will return the versions You will have to scrape the HTML.


1

Late answer A mini plugin as local API This plugin gives you - after you filled in the slug of your repository - the downloads stats as array. The keys are the dates, the values the downloads. <?php /** Plugin Name: (#84254) Plugin stats API */ function wpse84254_get_download_stats() { $response = wp_remote_request( add_query_arg( ...


1

I've answered a similar Question: Does the number of downloads displayed for a plug-in in the WordPress.org plug-in directory include automatic updates? This is Otto's blog post in make.wordpress.org with plenty of information about this stats. Excerpts from the whole page (article and comments), worth reading in full: First, on the extend plugin ...


1

In the readme.txt file, the "Screenshots" section is a special section. The WordPress plugin repository checks your Assets folder (or the folder containing readme.txt) for images named in a certain way and corresponds them to the entries in this section. I don't believe it is possible to attach images in the same way in any other section. Markdown does ...


1

if you have unwanted javascript on your page, it usually comes from plugins. deactivate them, and see if the javascript is still there. if it still is, try updating wordpress, or switching to another theme. if not, activate the plugins one by one, and check which one is putting this script to your head. after finding the plugin, decide if you need it, and if ...


1

From the update blog in Codex: SWFObject, which WordPress previously used to embed Flash content, and may still be in use by plugins and themes. So, this is used by some of your plugins. As previously stated by @fischi you should deactivate all your plugins, reload and then find out which exact plugin is adding the script. Then just make a cross file ...


1

OK, I figured it out. It took a bit of digging and many bad suggestions. The solution is actually quite simple. Just replace this in your theme files: Where you have this: <div class="comments"> <?php comments_template(); ?> </div> Replace it with this: <div class="comments"> <?php ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible