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I absolutely do not agree that mobile domains are a thing of the past. There is no reason why a smartphone should load a 5mb homepage to only use a small percentage of the resources.


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my name is Daniel Kanchev and I work for SiteGround as a Senior Web Apps Engineer. The described issue is pretty strange and I just configured a test WordPress Network on one SiteGround shared server. I did not face any similar issues and I used sub-domain names with a wildcard SSL certificate. Usually such issues are caused by Apache VHost misconfiguration ...


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What you have does indeed sound more like production and development. General practice it that between these two the data only goes from production to development, but never the other way. Having true staging, you can push the data from to production, is challenging precisely for the reasons you describe. There are solutions around, but even those on ...


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Add these values in your wp-config.php define( 'WP_HOME', 'http://www.example.com' ); define( 'WP_SITEURL', 'http://www.example.com' ); These will overwrite your database values with above. This is a temporary fix. But to fix this issue permanently. You will have to change URLs in database. You can run these mysql queries to change your URLs from ...


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For the second part: What plugin do you recommend for updating URL's? Ive used Velvet Blues Update URLs. It's made specifically for updating links when you have changed your domain name. It updates links embedded in content, excerpts, custom fields, and even attachments. It does directly change information in your database so be very careful when ...


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The first part of your question hangs more on how much control over web server configuration you have. If you can point new domain at the same location in filesystem — then no, you won't have to move a thing. Otherwise you do indeed need to move files. On other hand it's not that complicated to just move everything from one folder to another. If you have ...


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You should rather considering just making your site perfectly responsive, subdomains for mobile websites are thing of past, but some big website do still rely on it. Not because they want a mobile site, but because some of their main website features are yet not something that a mobile device should be left to handle. We are now at a stage where ...


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You can have a subdomain, but you cannot detect mobile users reliably. And you shouldn’t. How to use a subdomain with the same content In your wp-config.php, look at $_SERVER['HTTP_HOST']. If it matches m.example.com, enforce the current domain as main domain with … const DOMAIN_CURRENT_SITE = 'm.example.com'; … and filter the active theme: ...



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