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Try the beauty of multisite feature of wordpress. Here are some tutorial links: http://codex.wordpress.org/Create_A_Network http://premium.wpmudev.org/manuals/wordpress-multisite/ http://wpmu.org/wordpress-multisite-guide/ http://premium.wpmudev.org/manuals/wpmu-manual-2/wordpress-wordpress-mu-and-wordpress-multisite/ ...


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This should not be default behavior. The home_url template tag retrieves the home URL for the current site, optionally with the $path argument appended. The function determines the appropriate protocol, "https" if is_ssl() and "http" otherwise. If the $scheme argument is "http" or "https" the is_ssl() check is overridden. ...


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This part of code was introduced as whole block, together with a bunch of other stuff, quite a few years ago. See changeset 8069 in trac. While there is no clear mention in PHP docs, apparently in specific configurations the value might be a full URL with protocol. See for example $_SERVER['REQUEST_URI'] returns full URL instead of path to script question ...


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Yes, you can do this and it does not matter if plugins are different for the two sites, as you are not not using the same tables or anything. Still, if you use plugins that are badly written and build resource urls on top the home url, these will have issues (404 errors mostly).


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The first issue is your hosting company fault. The underlying library that performs the authentication that you are actually connecting to wordpress.org is probably missing some related configuration to be able to complete correctly the authentication. The solution they gave you is not secure and while I don't believe anything bad will happen because of ...


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There should not be a problem unless you have some misconfiguration or misbehaving theme or plugin. Wordpress core sends an http header that instructs caching servers to not cache the content being sent whenever the page is accessed by a logged-in user. For reference the headers are set at wp_get_nocache_headers and sent from send_headers, and from a 2 min ...


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Users which have logged-in via https should always be served content via https otherwise there is no point in having the login form use https at all. With http anyone can intercept the cookie and use it to get to the users's account without even knowing the user and password. The question here is probably why a logged in user is presented with an http link ...



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