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4

WordPress is very clearly engineered for being placed into web-accessible folder. While attempt to move it from web folder could be made, it would be very challenging, especially for admin area which uses direct non-routed URLs to PHP files.


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Here are some popular companies that provide managed WordPress hosting, from highest to lowest price (starting packages): WPEngine (starting at $29/month) Synthesis (starting at $27/month, for Genesis Framework users only) ZippyKid (starting at $25/month) Page.ly (starting at $19.95/month) It is worth choosing a host who specialises in WordPress, in my ...


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We've migrated a lot of people from Dreamhost after their site gets mildly popular, and they notice it's either down or slow. But, we don't offer hosting plans that are as cheap as them as well. I would recommend you check out zippykid.com (our site), page.ly, or wpengine.com if you're interested WordPress hosting that doesn't suck. I'd be willing to ...


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If you are serious about your website and care about your users experience you should stay away from any of the "budget" shared hosting packages. The only way they can offer hosting for less than the price of a Happy Meal is to squeeze thousands of sites on a server. If you don't want to be responsible for running your own server then any of the ...


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Your webhost is the foundation upon which your site will be built. Just like you wouldn't want to build a house on mud, you shouldn't be looking at 'cheap hosting'


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Some important factors when choosing a shared host: Do a reverse dns for the server ip, this can tell you how many sites are on the server, typically bad hosts jams a server with thousands of web sites, I have seen servers with upwards of 5k sites hosted (guess). Ask if they limit the accounts/domains per server and specifically what that # is. If they ...


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Your first issue is the fact that you're on shared hosting. The fact that 1,195 websites are using the same IP address is a dead giveaway. You're likely running into resource limits with your hosting provider. Second is a misconception of what caching does to optimize a site. Caching helps clean up and optimize load times on the front-end of your site. ...


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All of your content is linked to your localhost install. I would suggest using a plugin like Search & Replace to amend your URLs. Also if you haven't already, you will need to change the two entries in the wp_options table (where wp_ is the prefix used). They are rows 0 & 37. These are your URLs for moving your site. The next time you move your site ...


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I highly recommend Amazon AWS. You can continue to use WP Super Cache with Amazon S3 (for storage of your static files such as images etc). For high traffic scenarios, you can set up auto scaling rules of EC2 server instances to set up new servers as needed (and cut them when not needed). This is the best tute I've found on installing WP on EC2: ...


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Number of installs is not determined by WordPress, it is determined purely by hosting resources and policies. From personal experience even one blog with 1k daily visits can border overusing CPU quotas on crappy shared hosting with overstuffed server. If you want to force this through - request specific resource usage policies and hard numbers on what ...


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It depends on what you need. The software environment is the same you need for every other PHP site where you want to get an efficient workflow: up-to-date PHP (currently 5.5, so you can use Opcache) with at least 128 MB memory limit the same for MySQL web server with a rewrite engine regular backups SSH Git You can get that everywhere for 5 €/month. In ...


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You must change URLs in the database: Use these queries in phpmyadmin: UPDATE wp_options SET option_value = replace(option_value, 'http://www.olddomain.com/', 'http://www.newdomain.com/') WHERE option_name = 'home' OR option_name = 'siteurl'; UPDATE wp_posts SET guid = replace(guid, 'http://www.olddomain.com/blog/','http://www.newdomain.com/'); UPDATE ...


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Just use the built-in exporter/importer. Export from the existing site, and import into the new site. You won't ever even need to touch the database.


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@define('ADMIN_COOKIE_PATH', '/'); Putting this at the top of wp-config.php allows me to log in. Not sure if this is the proper way to set everything up, but it works... EDIT That only solved half of the problem. Permalinks were then broken. @toscho had the proper suggestion for anyone who may see this and has a similar issue. However, this hosting ...


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Dear you don't need to worry about much - if its a fresh installation and you don't have any data on your website - eg post, article, images or anything then I prefer you t install a clean fresh wordpress again from the sketches after a complete scan of your hosting. and if you have data in your hosting I am sure you can access your data base from cpanel or ...


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I would at least start you foundation on a VPS. That way you have the option for APC opcode cache. http://www.php.net/manual/en/intro.apc.php


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Hi @Jeremy: Of course you can optimize your servers like the hosting companies do, it just depends on how much skill you have and how much effort you want to take on. Here's a community wiki that might give you an idea of what to consider doing: Best-of-Breed Features of a High-End WordPress Web Host? One thing that comes to mind as a great feature is ...


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I think it is safe to say that 95% of hosting is marketing.


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The main problem is that you're using GoDaddy shared hosting to host 60-site multi-site systems and still expecting it to work. GoDaddy shared hosting is not appropriate for this kind of setup. Once you get past the 5-6 sites range, you need a dedicated server for them. Get a better hosting account. Pay for it.


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Here's a tutorial on how to export / import your WordPress database and run the queries you'll need so the new site works: http://web-kreation.com/tutorials/migrating-a-wordpress-site-ftp-phpmyadmin-and-sql-queries/ If you just want a local environment so you can play around with themes, this is a good tutorial for setting that up on your Mac: ...


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the Redirect directive is part of Apache's mod_alias, not mod_rewrite. mod_rewrite enables "pretty" permalinks, ie: http://yourdomain.com/a-post-title/ rather than "ugly" permalinks ie:http://yourdomain.com/?p=99. WordPress will operate just fine without mod_rewrite and pretty permalinks, it's just not as attractive or SEO friendly.


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I would go with cloudcontrol.com. They are a cloud-hosted PHP host, and they run on top of Amazon EC2. If you have little traffic, you won't pay. If your traffic goes up, they have an auto-scaler which will raise the capacity with traffic and lower it when traffic drops. (Scaling granularity is by the hour, and they charge about $0.05 per hour per extra app ...



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