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Your plugin users will need to register their site at https://www.google.com/recaptcha/admin to use the reCAPTCHA API. Once registered, users will need to provide you with their Site Key and Secret Key. The Site Key allows you to display the reCAPTCHA on your Registration form. The Secret Key is used to confirm the reCAPTCHA field input.


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If you can't modify anything on the server (site fully static) then there is no point in trying to break into it. In enterprise kind of setting you can achieve this by limiting login and restricting write permission to only people coming from the local network, but for most people this kind of setting is too hard to configure and maintain, and doesn't fit ...


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Well to say that these custom fields are insecure in the wp core tables is to say that the usernames and passwords are also insecure, along with any private or password protected posts. As long as you are not outputting these custom fields anywhere but a secure page for logged in, paid up users, no one could retrieve them without server side access to run a ...


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You can use this code in your functions.php to restrict users below admin level from changing their passwords: if ( is_admin() ) { add_action( 'init', 'disable_password_fields', 10 ); } function disable_password_fields() { if ( ! current_user_can( 'activate_plugins' ) ) { $show_password_fields = add_filter( 'show_password_fields', '__return_false' ...


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This is a very vast question so excuse me for not adding code. I do have a map for you. For sensible reasons, WordPress doesn't have a hook or filter that can help modify user passwords before they are saved in the database. The solution proposed by @jason-murray will hide the password fields in one location — on the user profile page. However, users ...


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The </head> tag is the giveaway; it should be in header.php.



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