Hot answers tagged

2

There are two typical approaches, depending on what you need and consider a page. First is a whole page page, HTML markup and everything. In this case the proper way is usually to create a template in your theme (or child theme), following template hierarchy and modify it. Another approach would be to use hooks to insert your changes, which is more typical ...


2

Nothing (you will ruin some web stats that look at it, but you probably son't care about that) Nothing No. Evil people don't care what is the value otherwise the easiest security measure would have been to change it instead of actually upgrading anything.


1

Ok i've found the solution. In fact, as i haven't noticed, there is always the hashed mdp, but for now, the logged_in cookie is structured like this : %login%|%timeout%|%sessionId%|%passhached% instead of : %login%|%timeout%|%passhached% This is like this since wordpress 4.0, and the wp_session_cookie integration, the auth method is the same that before ...


1

If the "attack" is distributed, the only thing you can do is to change the url of the login endpoint. This should be easy to do with web server config (block /login and friends, map some other "slug" to wp-login.php). This will also break the automatic redirect from /wp-admin to /login which is a good thing in this case. Don't forget to handle xml-rpc as ...


1

Duplicate the post.php in your theme folder. Rename that file as any_name.php Enter the following code at the top of that file. < ?php /* Template Name: Any Name */ ?> Add your php codes to that file. Go to admin panel -- > Create a new page -- > Select your template and publish the page


1

Any extra code on your server is a theoretical security risk. Instead of checking each plugin and theme if they are security risk even if they are not active, it is much easier to just delete them. This of course should not prevent you from backuping them first in case you will decide that you need them in the future ;)


1

are the updated newer major-versions significantly more secure than updated older ones? This is quite ambiguous. How significant or insignificant security changes might be, it is totally irrelevant. There might or might not be significant security enhancements between minor and major versions or even major versions as such. To really know how ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible