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The password strength meter in the latest versions of WordPress uses a library called "zxcvbn", made by Dropbox in 2012. The library is available for free on Github: https://github.com/dropbox/zxcvbn An explanation of the library is here: https://blogs.dropbox.com/tech/2012/04/zxcvbn-realistic-password-strength-estimation/ But the short version is that it ...


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So you're asking if you install WordPress in a subdirectory, like example.tld/secretwp/ and have the site pointing to example.tld, it will keep "evil" users and bots from knowing about the subdirectory? I don't think it will hold as a security advise, because your site can give away the subdirectory name in many ways. For example from: the use of ...


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Just to add to the answer by @birgire, check this post on how to hide the fact that you are using Wordpress. I also think that no post basically covers this, but it really help nothing following and applying everything to hide the fact you are using Wordpress and to secure Wordpress, and your code in itself is a security risk. Hackers are stubborn and ...


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No, the requests will still happen, even if it results in a 404. If you keep logging, you'll also notice attempts to log in to Drupal, Joomla, and other major CMS, including server exploits for IIS Apache and Nginx This is because they're automated opportunistic requests, they're not actually looking at your site, they're only looking for successful logins. ...


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(Partial answer as I'm familiar with AWS, not Google Drive.) Having a WordPress DB stored somewhere on a cloud service is, in my opinion, no worse that hosting the site on a virtual or cloud server (given virtualisation platforms all allow you to reset the server's root password - albeit typically with a reboot - so your entire machine is at risk if someone ...



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