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2

If this is done via WP Options API (as opposed to direct SQL query on database) you can use hooks to log it. Something along the lines of (not tested, make sure it works under normal option save first): add_filter( 'pre_update_option_siteurl', function ( $value ) { error_log( wp_debug_backtrace_summary() ); return $value; } ); Next time it ...


0

I think you messed up the value. home and siteurl values should not end up with a slash. A better query (assuming WP is in the root directory) would be: UPDATE wp_options SET options_value = 'https://www.example.com' WHERE option_name IN ('home','siteurl');


6

I work with several large WordPress sites, news sites specifically, that have thousands of posts and thousands of visitors (300k/day). With the stuff below, and a well coded theme, with well written queries, we're loading in 2.5s with 7 ad blocks from AdSense and RevContent. Do you have a CDN? I highly recommend a CDN if you don't have one. Depending on ...


5

Nginx is really good at concurrency (PHP not so much) so you should try a bit more than 180 requests per second. Maybe 500, or 1000 depending on your server resources and network throughput. The fastcgi_cache is served directly from ram. Wp-super-cache uses php to read a static file from the SSD so I see why it should be faster so why isn't it? It ...


3

No, it is not safe as it means that any security breach might end up in your code being changed. Alternatives: There is nothing wrong in using SFTP to upload changed plugins. If it is something that might take long time, you can manually put wordpress into maintenance mode by adding a file named .maintenance at the wordpress root directory and removing it ...



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