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11

Hi @ooo: Assuming you want to keep the same domain, it's really quite simple. Basically you copy the files using an FTP client by downloading from the old host and uploading to the new one, and then you copy the MySQL database by doing a database dump to a SQL script (this is your "export") and then running the script (and this is your "import".) The rest ...


9

Put old host in read-only mode Go to WP Admin -> Settings -> Discussion and check "Users must be registered and logged in to comment" Disable authentication: Create a PHP file inside the wp-content/mu-plugins folder, with the following content: <?php function wp_get_current_user() { return new WP_User(-1); } This will prevent all logged-in ...


8

I think we also need a few more features: Minifying JS, CSS and the HTML that is being sent down the wire. Caching the op-code of the PHP that will be generated (apart from Memcached). Upload the JS, CSS and Images that are used in the theme and/or plugin to a CDN and sync automatically. Option to use one of the public CDN netwoks like Google for common ...


8

You're asking for quite a bit, and all I can really tell you is that you get what you pay for. Why you should avoid "free" sites Most free hosts are pretty much bargain-basement deals when it comes to features. Remember, few people will ever give things away and stay in business - so support on a free hosting site might be non-existent. Many will also ...


7

You explicitly mention three services in your question title: EC2, RDS and EBS. If they're the three services you're interested in, then yes, very easily. EC2 + EBS are pretty much the same thing, EBS is simply a persistent storage extension to EC2, and RDS is a full MySQL database - you should be able to get those three services running together very ...


7

It always depends on the point of view. A webhost should offer much RAM much more RAM much CPU much more CPU a separated Database Server from the Server hosting the Website (HTTP Server) to setup the Database as Master/Client to automatically outsource Files to a (private or public) CDN a hosting service for comments so they don't rely on your blog (like ...


7

Here's a very comprehensive guide if someone can help me format it correctly. Sorry, I don't have the time right now to figure out the formatting... A. FTP-copy all theme and wp/upload files from {old_site} to {new_site} Use FTP client to copy from {old_site} to temp folder on local machine Copy from temp folder to {new_site} B. Backup (export) existing ...


6

Yes, it is possible. You can setup subdomains sites like this: subdomain1.domain.com, subdomains2.domain.com. Then, after you setup the network, use a domain mapping plugin to setup a domain name for each of them. subdomain1.domain.com becomes domain1.com, subdomain2.domain.com becomes domain2.com, etc. There are several domain mapping plugins out there: ...


6

The main gotcha when changing servers are hard-coded urls and file paths WP. They appear: In the upload path option, under settings / misc (now settings / uploads, if memory serves), on old WP installs. In attachment meta data, on very old WP installs. In your htaccess file, and possibly rewrite rules, if your site lives in a subfolder. In the site URL and ...


6

You can also set an apache Alias to say /blog is /path/to/wordpress so it's technically not inside your RoR app, you can deploy/make changes to the RoR app all day long then, without the need to worry about overwriting wordpress files.


6

Have a look at page.ly WP Engine I'm sure there are plenty of others. I'm specifically discounting hosts that provide 1-click installs because even they require some administration.


6

I use a script called git-ftp, which simply uses FTP to push changes from a git repo onto a server.


6

There's a pretty good step by step on moving WordPress in the Codex. It is what I follow when changing domains. Moving the files is pretty straight-forward. It is the hard-coded references in the database that are tricky. However, serialized search and replace will take care of all database changes. I've used the Velvet Blues plugin in the past, but ...


6

IMPORTANT EDIT This has unknowingly came to my attention as it slipped my mind, PHP 5.4 have already reach EOL and the last security support was stopped on the 14th of September 2015. According to official documentation, PHP 5.5 will finally reach its EOL on the 10 of July 2016 (Active support has already been stopped but this version will still get ...


5

I think it really breaks down to your traffic. The slower the hardware, the slower (the already slow) page generation. It's not specific to WP, it's the same for all large php scripts. If you get a server hit every now and then, as on a dev box or a family blog, it's no big deal. It'll just spit out pages more slowly. If you get concurrent hits on a regular ...


5

@Tal, In terms of performance an unmanaged VPS will be better than a managed one. A Managed VPS will almost always come with CPanel which is great for shared hosting and for hosting companies to easily manage your VPS for you. You can still install any of the Opcode caching tools (APC, eAccelerator, XCache, MemCached) on a managed VPS with CPanel but ...


5

Please read through the following: http://codex.wordpress.org/License http://wordpress.org/about/license/ http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/GPL http://www.gnu.org/licenses/gpl.html You can't can sell it as software or development, although and/or you can also charge for maintanance and install. Anyway, you should at least donate to the plugin developers, if ...


5

Under GPL you CAN resell the software. You may charge a fee for the physical act of transferring a copy, and you may at your option offer warranty protection in exchange for a fee. GPLv2 Section 1 The main restriction is if you do sell (or give away) you must: 1) allow others to resell your works 2) provide them with the original and modified source ...


5

I'm probably overcomplicating things. Right now, you are. As I have no traffic as of now I don't really need to do this, but .... I don't know what to choose as I don't understand what these services really do, other than it's supposed to be "better" to host externally... Then why bother with a CDN right now and all of the image hosting options ...


5

While this might be not the easiest task for a beginner, it is very well possible – with a little help from some plugins. In a similar scenario I would usually install WordPress under a subdomain. When everything is looking ok to launch, I would recommend to first (always!) make a backup of everything. You can then change the base url (domain) either ...


4

Thomas McDonald is pretty much right on track. Just wanted to add that if you're going to use EC2 to scale your sites as you need more servers, then you will need to contend with the fact that you will have multiple instances of your site out there with no common shared volumes. In other words, let's say you have 2 EC2 instances up -- each one is ...


4

Access to a shell for the operations better done from the command line than the dashboard.


4

Its not recommended often enough, but Flickr is an excellent image host for blogs as well. Their pro account costs only $25/year. You get unlimited image, video uploads and no bandwidth limit. If you don't want your blog image uploads populating your personal photostream, you can easily create a separate account for it. You can easily streamline your ...


4

Based on your needs, yes: you should probably be using a Network (WordPress with MultiSite enabled). All network sites run the same version of WordPress Each network site can activate its own Plugins. You can explicitly allow each site to manage its own Plugins. Each network site can have access to different Themes (though you will have to manage access to ...


4

You should not need the .git directory but I would not delete it. It contains the version control for your site, and is thus an incredibly valuable resource should you need a developer to fix or upgrade your site in the future. It also shows you a full history of the development of your site. This will save future developers time, and anything that saves ...


4

I utilize the awesome plugin Duplicator to complete this exact procedure on a regular basis. http://wordpress.org/extend/plugins/duplicator/ The plugin is fully supported and there are great FAQ available here: http://lifeinthegrid.com/labs/duplicator/ The plugin will create a .zip backup of both your database and files and an installer .php that you ...


4

WordPress is very clearly engineered for being placed into web-accessible folder. While attempt to move it from web folder could be made, it would be very challenging, especially for admin area which uses direct non-routed URLs to PHP files.


4

WordPress will run on a toaster these days, it really doesn't have high requirements. Just make sure it's a Linux server, any comapny worth anything will have PHP and mySQL up to date enough for WordPress. What your're going to have to struggle with is different companies offering different packages and then not being fully honest. A mid range package on ...


4

Assuming your domain is mydomain.org. Instead of installing WordPress under a different domain (wordpress.mydomain.org) you could install WordPress on your local machine (using XAMPP MAMP or a virtual box) and resolving the original domain to your local computer by editing your systems host file and add the following line: 127.0.0.1 mydomain.org Now ...


3

I would compare your hosting needs to what WordPress VIP Hosting provides for a flat rate of $500 per month with a $1,500 set up fee. Here is what they provide for that amount: Your site running on the WordPress.com grid (over 1,200 servers in three data centers) Unlimited space and bandwidth 24/7 IT support Content Delivery Network and hourly backups ...



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