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11

Hi @ooo: Assuming you want to keep the same domain, it's really quite simple. Basically you copy the files using an FTP client by downloading from the old host and uploading to the new one, and then you copy the MySQL database by doing a database dump to a SQL script (this is your "export") and then running the script (and this is your "import".) The rest ...


9

Put old host in read-only mode Go to WP Admin -> Settings -> Discussion and check "Users must be registered and logged in to comment" Disable authentication: Create a PHP file inside the wp-content/mu-plugins folder, with the following content: <?php function wp_get_current_user() { return new WP_User(-1); } This will prevent all logged-in ...


8

I think we also need a few more features: Minifying JS, CSS and the HTML that is being sent down the wire. Caching the op-code of the PHP that will be generated (apart from Memcached). Upload the JS, CSS and Images that are used in the theme and/or plugin to a CDN and sync automatically. Option to use one of the public CDN netwoks like Google for common ...


7

It always depends on the point of view. A webhost should offer much RAM much more RAM much CPU much more CPU a separated Database Server from the Server hosting the Website (HTTP Server) to setup the Database as Master/Client to automatically outsource Files to a (private or public) CDN a hosting service for comments so they don't rely on your blog (like ...


7

You explicitly mention three services in your question title: EC2, RDS and EBS. If they're the three services you're interested in, then yes, very easily. EC2 + EBS are pretty much the same thing, EBS is simply a persistent storage extension to EC2, and RDS is a full MySQL database - you should be able to get those three services running together very ...


7

Here's a very comprehensive guide if someone can help me format it correctly. Sorry, I don't have the time right now to figure out the formatting... A. FTP-copy all theme and wp/upload files from {old_site} to {new_site} Use FTP client to copy from {old_site} to temp folder on local machine Copy from temp folder to {new_site} B. Backup (export) existing ...


6

I use a script called git-ftp, which simply uses FTP to push changes from a git repo onto a server.


6

Yes, it is possible. You can setup subdomains sites like this: subdomain1.domain.com, subdomains2.domain.com. Then, after you setup the network, use a domain mapping plugin to setup a domain name for each of them. subdomain1.domain.com becomes domain1.com, subdomain2.domain.com becomes domain2.com, etc. There are several domain mapping plugins out there: ...


6

The main gotcha when changing servers are hard-coded urls and file paths WP. They appear: In the upload path option, under settings / misc (now settings / uploads, if memory serves), on old WP installs. In attachment meta data, on very old WP installs. In your htaccess file, and possibly rewrite rules, if your site lives in a subfolder. In the site URL and ...


6

You can also set an apache Alias to say /blog is /path/to/wordpress so it's technically not inside your RoR app, you can deploy/make changes to the RoR app all day long then, without the need to worry about overwriting wordpress files.


6

You're asking for quite a bit, and all I can really tell you is that you get what you pay for. Why you should avoid "free" sites Most free hosts are pretty much bargain-basement deals when it comes to features. Remember, few people will ever give things away and stay in business - so support on a free hosting site might be non-existent. Many will also ...


6

There's a pretty good step by step on moving WordPress in the Codex. It is what I follow when changing domains. Moving the files is pretty straight-forward. It is the hard-coded references in the database that are tricky. However, serialized search and replace will take care of all database changes. I've used the Velvet Blues plugin in the past, but ...


5

I think it really breaks down to your traffic. The slower the hardware, the slower (the already slow) page generation. It's not specific to WP, it's the same for all large php scripts. If you get a server hit every now and then, as on a dev box or a family blog, it's no big deal. It'll just spit out pages more slowly. If you get concurrent hits on a regular ...


5

@Tal, In terms of performance an unmanaged VPS will be better than a managed one. A Managed VPS will almost always come with CPanel which is great for shared hosting and for hosting companies to easily manage your VPS for you. You can still install any of the Opcode caching tools (APC, eAccelerator, XCache, MemCached) on a managed VPS with CPanel but ...


5

Please read through the following: http://codex.wordpress.org/License http://wordpress.org/about/license/ http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/GPL http://www.gnu.org/licenses/gpl.html You can't can sell it as software or development, although and/or you can also charge for maintanance and install. Anyway, you should at least donate to the plugin developers, if ...


5

Under GPL you CAN resell the software. You may charge a fee for the physical act of transferring a copy, and you may at your option offer warranty protection in exchange for a fee. GPLv2 Section 1 The main restriction is if you do sell (or give away) you must: 1) allow others to resell your works 2) provide them with the original and modified source ...


5

Have a look at page.ly WP Engine I'm sure there are plenty of others. I'm specifically discounting hosts that provide 1-click installs because even they require some administration.


4

Its not recommended often enough, but Flickr is an excellent image host for blogs as well. Their pro account costs only $25/year. You get unlimited image, video uploads and no bandwidth limit. If you don't want your blog image uploads populating your personal photostream, you can easily create a separate account for it. You can easily streamline your ...


4

Thomas McDonald is pretty much right on track. Just wanted to add that if you're going to use EC2 to scale your sites as you need more servers, then you will need to contend with the fact that you will have multiple instances of your site out there with no common shared volumes. In other words, let's say you have 2 EC2 instances up -- each one is ...


4

Access to a shell for the operations better done from the command line than the dashboard.


4

I utilize the awesome plugin Duplicator to complete this exact procedure on a regular basis. http://wordpress.org/extend/plugins/duplicator/ The plugin is fully supported and there are great FAQ available here: http://lifeinthegrid.com/labs/duplicator/ The plugin will create a .zip backup of both your database and files and an installer .php that you ...


4

WordPress is very clearly engineered for being placed into web-accessible folder. While attempt to move it from web folder could be made, it would be very challenging, especially for admin area which uses direct non-routed URLs to PHP files.


4

You should not need the .git directory but I would not delete it. It contains the version control for your site, and is thus an incredibly valuable resource should you need a developer to fix or upgrade your site in the future. It also shows you a full history of the development of your site. This will save future developers time, and anything that saves ...


3

You will have a few things to consider (later on the answer), I suggest the following steps: Backup your Files and Database This is pretty self-explanatory. You are going to do a lot of Data Manipulation, so be sure your original is safe. Transfer your files The fastest way to do this is to have a hoster where you can import directories from another ...


3

I just made a tutorial on how to do a site update directly from github using a cloud server ( PHP application), in this demo I am using Engine Yard, but ther are other apps, it's pretty crazy what you can do these days. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8ZEiFi4thDI&feature=feedlik


3

We are using Mercurial via Bitbucket, but same logic applies: Clone repository to server. Protect it from being web-accessed. Create PHP script that will issue pull and update command to the repo. Set up Bitbucket to ping PHP script on commit. This is not quite "proper" deployment scheme, but it hugely streamlines workflow on development servers that ...


3

From a quick look at wpengines headers it looks like there may be some info you can check. Your best bet is to get access to an account and dump out $_SERVER to see what's in there. For example it looks like $_SERVER['SERVER_NAME'] = 'WP Engine/4.0'. or perhaps $_SERVER['HTTP_HOST']. As per the comments below it also seems the wp-config.php on wpengine ...


3

I'm probably overcomplicating things. Right now, you are. As I have no traffic as of now I don't really need to do this, but .... I don't know what to choose as I don't understand what these services really do, other than it's supposed to be "better" to host externally... Then why bother with a CDN right now and all of the image hosting ...


3

You need to update the new URL in the WordPress Address (URL) and Site Address (URL) in General settings. Some of your media may be pointing your old site or may not be available in that case you need to install a plugin named Search and Replace and you need to replace the every occurrence of the old URL with the new one.


3

WordPress seems to be one of the poster children of PHP on Azure, so you can find many resources explaining how to install it.



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