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4

"GUID" stands for "Globally Unique Identifier" mainly used by feeds to tell if that specific post was shown on the feed before or not, even if you change domains. When developing on local host and the moving to live (+1 just for that BTW) and no feed reader/burner has read your feeds and only if that is the case it's OK to change it and start fresh on your ...


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1) The GUID is exactly that -- a GUID. It's used to uniquely identify the post. If you need to link to a post, then use get_permalink( $post_ID ) ($post_ID is optional) (link: get_permalink). 2) Not without a plugin, no. There's talk of using an image shortcode for 3.1 though, or maybe 3.2. In the meantime, you can try using an alpha version of my ...


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If you want to offer an ATOM feed for your attachments you should pass a GUID to wp_insert_attachment() or add a filter for 'get_the_guid' that handles empty values. In most (all?) other cases I wouldn’t care about it.


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The GUID exists as a unique identifier for feeds. Feed readers need this in order to cache feeds and not keep repeating the same content. It's not safe to give a GUID of http://domain/?p=[n] where [n] equals any number because when new content is created (including auto saves) WordPress assigns a GUID. If your GUID's don't follow the WordPress structure ...


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The FeedWordPress Duplicate Post Filter add-on might take care of this faster than trying to hunt down the root cause. It'll probably turn out to be a problem in the feed itself, which you wouldn't likely have any control over. Despite the formats being fairly simple and well-documented, many sites/applications just can't seem to produce a proper feed, for ...


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After changing siteurl, Go to admin panel and update permalink structure once and check.It will start working with new folder name. Hope it helps


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The GUID should not be used to generate any URLs for the site (caveat below), so it shouldn't hurt to leave them as they are... unless some badly designed plugin decides that GUIDs are a great shortcut to getting an URL. What the GUID is, is a globally unique identifier-- global as in "throughout all space and time". Feed readers use it to keep track of ...


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In a nutshell - GUID is not supposed to hold meaningful data and the fact that at this moment the data in it happens to be meaningful is coincidental. WordPress does no verification whatsoever that GUIDs mean anything. They are not guaranteed to stay immutable if you rely on that and they are not changed when that needs to happen if they are treated as ...


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Background: The guid should be just what the name says: a globally unique identifier. A unique string or number, not related to a public address at all. However, some functions, namely for images, are still using it for URLs. There are plans to fix that somewhere in the future, see #6492. For now, you can safely change the value of that field, as long as ...


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I have updated the URLs stored in the database when the domain has changed. Here are the things to watch for: In the posts table, the post_content will have any embedded links. These you can change without issue. Again in the posts table, the gid would change if you do a global search and replace. This is mostly used with regard to RSS feeds. You can ...


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See the Moving WordPress page in the Codex. When your domain name or URLs change - i.e. from http://example.com/blog to http://example.com, or http://example.com to http://newexample.com - there are additional concerns. The files and database can be moved, however references to the old domain name or location will remain in the database, and that can ...


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The GUID is not an URL. Use get_permalink() to get the correct URLs. Just ignore the GUID. It is – as the name says – an identifier.


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Problem 1: Yes, you should not use the guid in the template code. See this recent thread from the wp-hackers mailing-list: http://lists.automattic.com/pipermail/wp-hackers/2010-September/034559.html Problem 2: This question is actually one of the most discussed. :) http://lists.automattic.com/pipermail/wp-hackers/2010-September/034652.html ...


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The feed template files call the_guid(), which calls get_the_guid(), which has a filter named (surprisingly) get_the_guid. You can hook into this filter to change the output. The filter only gets the current GUID, not the post ID, so look this up in the global variable if you need it. add_filter( 'get_the_guid', 'wpse17463_get_the_guid' ); function ...


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Check out this search and replace plugin. The benefit of using an absolute URL is that you can easily find and replace it, either with the plugin linked above or an SQL statement or even using some built in WordPress API's. So I wouldn't do anything differently the next time. I used the search and replace plugin when I moved domains. Worked great. I would ...


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1.) GUID's in WordPress primarily exist for RSS readers. They are supposed to be unique identifiers so RSS feeds don't republish the same content over and over again. They are not designed to be used within WordPress posts or pages. Even though they may look like permalinks, they aren't and should never be confused with them. For this reason, the URL part ...


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Short answer: yes The GUID field is meant to represent a globally unique identifier for the post. In WordPress we just happen to use the URL. The GUID field should never be thought of as an actual URL, though ... just an identifier for the post. In reality, the GUID field could contain anything that's unique. But if you have two posts that share the ...



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