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13

If you edit your wp-config.php file you can preload these FTP settings as constants read by WordPress. Keep in mind, on a shared host, you should be mindful of possible security implications. See Editing wp-config.php for more information. Your settings will vary, but these work for me and my hosting setup. I've included some of the unused constants, ...


10

Check your file ownership. When the user that apache runs as can write to the wordpress directories, then the integrated upgrade process all just works without ftp. The FTP credentials are for if the web server doesn't have the right priviledges on your files, then wordpress prompts you for your FTP details, and attempts to use those to FTP back to the same ...


10

Set file permissions On Mac OS X (Leopard), the Apache HTTP Server runs under the user account, _www which belongs to the group _www. To allow WordPress to configure wp-config.php during installation, update files during upgrades, and update the .htaccess file for pretty permalinks, give the server write permission on the files. One way to do this is to ...


5

You can save this information on your wp-config.php file: define('FTP_HOST', 'ftp_host'); define('FTP_USER', 'ftp_username'); define('FTP_PASS', 'ftp_password'); More info (WordPress Codex)


4

Short answer: yes you can upgrade your plugins via FTP. Download the new version of the plugin. Disable the plugin you are about to update. Upload files over the top of the plugin. Re-enable plugin If the plugin is written well stats, settings and options should remain intact. As Rarst has already mentioned the automated upgrader just overwites files. ...


4

define('FS_METHOD', 'ftpext'); define('FTP_BASE', '/path/to/wordpress/'); define('FTP_CONTENT_DIR', '/path/to/wordpress/wp-content/'); define('FTP_PLUGIN_DIR ', '/path/to/wordpress/wp-content/plugins/'); define('FTP_PUBKEY', '/home/username/.ssh/id_rsa.pub'); define('FTP_PRIKEY', '/home/username/.ssh/id_rsa'); define('FTP_USER', 'username'); ...


4

Sorry for posting the question above, I fixed it right after posting here, by following these steps I found on this site http://artofsimplicity.co.uk/wordpress-ftp-auto-upgrade-on-ubuntu sudo apt-get install vsftpd sudo useradd wordpress sudo passwd wordpress # set password for wordpress when prompted. sudo usermod -g www-data wordpress sudo chmod -R g+w ...


4

Parts of WordPress use (s)FTP to transfer files. Updates, for example, use (s)FTP. Media uploads do not, at least not unless something has changed in 3.7. If you are connecting to an (s)FTP server you have to provide the credentials that that server needs. Your file permissions won't come into play until after that connection is made. There are constants ...


3

Try to use relative URLs to your imported css files. So try to remove first / from each import URL: @import url('styles/forms.css'); @import url('styles/tables.css'); @import url('styles/homepage.css'); @import url('styles/reset.css'); @import url('styles/stimenu.css'); @import url('styles/layout.css'); @import url('styles/demo.css'); Also pay attention ...


3

Yes, the plugin @Squideyes suggests you, is perfectly fine, and should do the trick. However, I don't like the link-to-plugin only answers, so here the mine. If you upload the file to a subfolder of the WordPress uploads folder (by default wp-content/uploads, but can be easily changed) than convert a file from there to an attachment post is pretty easy via ...


3

Depending on your version of OS X, you will need to configure and run FTP and open a port in the firewall. It's best if you google your OS X version - 10.6, 10.7, etc. - specifically and find the docs necessary to set up FTP and Sharing. You also need to realize the security implications of opening up FTP to your local machine; someone port scanning your IP ...


3

Here are a couple of options: WP htaccess Control - will let you manually edit your .htaccess file All-in-one htaccess Plugin - will let you dynamically create an .htaccess file based on which modules/features you want set up When all else fails, turn to Google ...


3

It seems that not only does WordPress check if the directories are writable, but it checks if the Apache user OWNS the directories (or at least, if the Apache user owns the temporary file it creates). Observe these lines of code at /wp-admin/includes/file.php: get_filesystem_method(): if ( $temp_handle ) { if ( getmyuid() == ...


2

It could be a problem with your file encoding. Make sure that your files are encoded in the same way as your wordpress install. In most cases your site use files encoded in UTF-8. Go to FileZilla options: Open Site Manager > Charset tab - Custom Encoding > and see if it's UTF-8. When it's set properly try to open and edit a file and see if it works!


2

You can automagically copy files from SVN, but there are steps that will always require some sort of human interaction, such as the initial database setup. That said, a WordPress install is totally scriptable.


2

Local web server is a must, it's pretty much generic web server stack (Apache, MySQL, PHP plus other bits) only running on your local computer. Deployment depends on how you manage your code: just resides on your computer - you will need to sync it to remote server in some way (FTP, SFTP, etc), any decent software for such is smart enough to transfer ...


2

When you do something that requires WordPress write to the filesystem, it does a check to see if it has permissions to do so by writing a temp file. If this check fails it will ask for FTP details in order to write the files to your server. EDIT look in wp-admin/includes/file.php, line 843, for the get_filesystem_method function that does this check.


2

This is most likely because of file permissions on your server. WordPress needs to be able to write to the wp-content folder. I highly suggest you read this article about changing file permissions for WordPress. You may also need to CHOWN the directory that contains WordPress to the user that your web server uses. More here.


2

if you have access to the .htaccess file in your www folder. Just include the following 2 lines in .htaccess: php_value upload_max_filesize 50M php_value post_max_size 50M Other way .. you can place this piece of code in your theme's functions.php file @ini_set( 'upload_max_size' , '50M' ); @ini_set( 'post_max_size', '50M');


2

This issue is solved. The permission problem has to do with how files are uploaded to the WordPress site while updating. The suPHP solution is my preference at this point because it is simpler and requires less permissions on files, but if you don't want to do that then you'll have to take care to get your FTP user playing nicely with WordPress. suPHP ...


1

I would consider it somewhat safe since that's where your database connection information is also stored. One could easily ruin your website by deleting your whole database if they had access to that file. There are a couple of things you can do to increase security: Move the wp-config file one level outside the root. Wordpress knows to look for the file ...


1

You can simply delete the lines from your wp-config.php. define('FTP_HOST', 'yourhost.com'); define('FTP_USER', 'youruser'); define('FTP_PASS', 'yourpass'); However, this does not automatically mean that you are secure. There are a lot of backdoors where malware could be injected, starting from the server, security-issues in your plugins, outdated ...


1

According to the codex, you should be able to split the XML file into pieces and import them separately. Here is how I would do it. The WordPress XML export file is in a format they call WordPress eXtended RSS (WXR), and looks like this (some lines left out): <?xml version="1.0" encoding="UTF-8" ?> <rss version="2.0" > <channel> ...


1

Okay, this may sound crazy, but have you tried absolute directory refs, i.e. /var/www/public_html/ for FTP_BASE? It does say in the codex: FTP_BASE is the full path to the "base"(ABSPATH) folder of the WordPress installation.


1

What i found is that if all the folder containing WP own to the web-user, you can install via web interface anything. In my case, Linux, my user is www-data, so i just run the next command chown -R www-data:www-data wp-folder where wp-folder is the folder containing my WP app (use sudo if the user is not root). And that's it. Now I can install themes and ...


1

The problem with WordPress not being able to install plugins or update itself is because WordPress uses the Apache 'user' for all its processes. In the case of Ubuntu / Linux the Apache user and group is www-data:www-data. By doing sudo chown www-data:www-data /wordpress your changing the ownership of all files. A problem can occur if your user account ...


1

Are you using Lion? If so, Apple dropped support for managing the FTP service via the Sharing settings. But the underlying service is still available. You can manually enable it by running this command in the terminal sudo launchctl load -w /System/Library/LaunchDaemons/ftp.plist Then you can stop and start the service like this: sudo launchctl stop ...


1

If you want to share the same wordpress installation for multiple sites/blogs, I'd suggest looking at WordPress Networks. And if you need different domain names (and not just subpath or subdomain) you could go with the plugin called WordPress MU Domain Mapping. If you have lower level access to your server (and not just a shared hosting) then you could ...


1

What if you try http://wordpress.org/extend/plugins/ssh-sftp-updater-support/ ? If that doesn't work you can do a quick code change to get the logs with which the developer of that plugin can use do more diagnostics.


1

Sounds like your Template has 2 style sheets, one that is unused. By default WordPress will look for style.css in the editor but this doesn't necessary mean its used in the header.php Take a look at your source code and view which css files are being loaded. I suspect your see it something like: /wp-content/themes/your-theme/css/blah.css Rather than ...



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