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14

Set file permissions On Mac OS X (Leopard), the Apache HTTP Server runs under the user account, _www which belongs to the group _www. To allow WordPress to configure wp-config.php during installation, update files during upgrades, and update the .htaccess file for pretty permalinks, give the server write permission on the files. One way to do this is to ...


13

If you edit your wp-config.php file you can preload these FTP settings as constants read by WordPress. Keep in mind, on a shared host, you should be mindful of possible security implications. See Editing wp-config.php for more information. Your settings will vary, but these work for me and my hosting setup. I've included some of the unused constants, ...


12

The solution I found that worked on my Mac running the builtin Apache2 was to add this to 'wp-config.php' define('FS_METHOD','direct');


10

Check your file ownership. When the user that apache runs as can write to the wordpress directories, then the integrated upgrade process all just works without ftp. The FTP credentials are for if the web server doesn't have the right priviledges on your files, then wordpress prompts you for your FTP details, and attempts to use those to FTP back to the same ...


7

WordPress does support making connections using SSH (aka SFTP) via the built in updater system. It got this support in version 2.7, approximately 6 years ago. Reference: https://core.trac.wordpress.org/ticket/7690 If you're not seeing it in the normal "credentials" screen, then this is because your PHP installation lacks the support necessary for it to be ...


5

If you're on a shared server, it's unlikely your host will correct this issue, but you can add the upgrade constants to your wp-config file so it will at least stop asking every time.


5

You can save this information on your wp-config.php file: define('FTP_HOST', 'ftp_host'); define('FTP_USER', 'ftp_username'); define('FTP_PASS', 'ftp_password'); More info (WordPress Codex)


4

This is a permissions issue. wp-content/plugins must be writable by the web server user.


4

Short answer: yes you can upgrade your plugins via FTP. Download the new version of the plugin. Disable the plugin you are about to update. Upload files over the top of the plugin. Re-enable plugin If the plugin is written well stats, settings and options should remain intact. As Rarst has already mentioned the automated upgrader just overwites files. ...


4

define('FS_METHOD', 'ftpext'); define('FTP_BASE', '/path/to/wordpress/'); define('FTP_CONTENT_DIR', '/path/to/wordpress/wp-content/'); define('FTP_PLUGIN_DIR ', '/path/to/wordpress/wp-content/plugins/'); define('FTP_PUBKEY', '/home/username/.ssh/id_rsa.pub'); define('FTP_PRIKEY', '/home/username/.ssh/id_rsa'); define('FTP_USER', 'username'); ...


4

Sorry for posting the question above, I fixed it right after posting here, by following these steps I found on this site http://artofsimplicity.co.uk/wordpress-ftp-auto-upgrade-on-ubuntu sudo apt-get install vsftpd sudo useradd wordpress sudo passwd wordpress # set password for wordpress when prompted. sudo usermod -g www-data wordpress sudo chmod -R g+w ...


4

Parts of WordPress use (s)FTP to transfer files. Updates, for example, use (s)FTP. Media uploads do not, at least not unless something has changed in 3.7. If you are connecting to an (s)FTP server you have to provide the credentials that that server needs. Your file permissions won't come into play until after that connection is made. There are constants ...


4

Here's a much better solution: Don't edit the theme's functions.php file. Don't put your custom code into that file either. If you have snippets of code for a site, put them into a custom plugin. Put each one into its own plugin, in fact. Separate them by functionality. I even made a handy dandy plugin to make this easier, called Pluginception. The nice ...


3

Of course there are better ways to do that. You could use some local installation with a copy of your online website with software such as WAMP, XAMP, etc to make your changes. "Cow Boy" coding is never a good solution. If you miss one ; boom! Fatal error! And in your case this is live. You could also use better process such as git workflows to have a ...


3

Yes, the plugin @Squideyes suggests you, is perfectly fine, and should do the trick. However, I don't like the link-to-plugin only answers, so here the mine. If you upload the file to a subfolder of the WordPress uploads folder (by default wp-content/uploads, but can be easily changed) than convert a file from there to an attachment post is pretty easy via ...


3

It seems that not only does WordPress check if the directories are writable, but it checks if the Apache user OWNS the directories (or at least, if the Apache user owns the temporary file it creates). Observe these lines of code at /wp-admin/includes/file.php: get_filesystem_method(): if ( $temp_handle ) { if ( getmyuid() == ...


3

Try to use relative URLs to your imported css files. So try to remove first / from each import URL: @import url('styles/forms.css'); @import url('styles/tables.css'); @import url('styles/homepage.css'); @import url('styles/reset.css'); @import url('styles/stimenu.css'); @import url('styles/layout.css'); @import url('styles/demo.css'); Also pay attention ...


3

Depending on your version of OS X, you will need to configure and run FTP and open a port in the firewall. It's best if you google your OS X version - 10.6, 10.7, etc. - specifically and find the docs necessary to set up FTP and Sharing. You also need to realize the security implications of opening up FTP to your local machine; someone port scanning your IP ...


3

You should demand access to ftp or the command line, working without is is crippling and to be blunt, silly.


3

Here are a couple of options: WP htaccess Control - will let you manually edit your .htaccess file All-in-one htaccess Plugin - will let you dynamically create an .htaccess file based on which modules/features you want set up When all else fails, turn to Google ...


2

Try looking in the {$prefix}_options table in the WordPress MySQL database


2

It could be a problem with your file encoding. Make sure that your files are encoded in the same way as your wordpress install. In most cases your site use files encoded in UTF-8. Go to FileZilla options: Open Site Manager > Charset tab - Custom Encoding > and see if it's UTF-8. When it's set properly try to open and edit a file and see if it works!


2

Many hosts offer cPanel, which includes a File Manager. You can open the file from there. You may need to check that it's showing hidden file types.


2

You can automagically copy files from SVN, but there are steps that will always require some sort of human interaction, such as the initial database setup. That said, a WordPress install is totally scriptable.


2

Local web server is a must, it's pretty much generic web server stack (Apache, MySQL, PHP plus other bits) only running on your local computer. Deployment depends on how you manage your code: just resides on your computer - you will need to sync it to remote server in some way (FTP, SFTP, etc), any decent software for such is smart enough to transfer ...


2

It should work just fine, plugin options should (and usually are) stored in database. Automatic upgrade doesn't do much other than overwriting files.


2

When you do something that requires WordPress write to the filesystem, it does a check to see if it has permissions to do so by writing a temp file. If this check fails it will ask for FTP details in order to write the files to your server. EDIT look in wp-admin/includes/file.php, line 843, for the get_filesystem_method function that does this check.


2

Just add this line in your wp-config.php: define( 'FS_METHOD', 'direct' );


2

Yes, download them via FTP. Just connect to your server, then navigate to /wp-content/uploads to see all of your uploads. By default, they're organized into directories: /{year}/{month}/{file} ... so /2012/05/my-image.jpg for example.


2

This is most likely because of file permissions on your server. WordPress needs to be able to write to the wp-content folder. I highly suggest you read this article about changing file permissions for WordPress. You may also need to CHOWN the directory that contains WordPress to the user that your web server uses. More here.



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