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f you're using anything that allows you to configure SMTP within WordPress, take it out. Then put everything into a function: add_action('init','delay_until_init'); function delay_until_init(){ // call wp_mail() here }


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Based on your updated question and comments, this should be what you are looking for: function wpse_225078_wpbd_tags( $tags ) { $tags['one_time_link'] = one_time_link(); return $tags; } add_filter( 'wpbe_tags', 'wpse_225078_wpbd_tags' ); The idea is to hook into the tag system provided by WPBE so you can just use %one_time_link% in your email ...


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Finally I figured out the cause and solution to my problem above. When I trying to send email in sub domain say http://test1.example.com, without custom From email address in header, the wp_mail() function itself sets the From email as support@test1.example.com which is invalid and hence the email was not sent. So to solve this, myself added a custom From ...


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I run into the same issue and after a research, I found out that this is a bug with class-phpmailer.php. The bug was apparently introduced in WP 4.3.2. Even if the changelog doesn't mention it, the file was modified. Only reverting wp-includes/class-phpmailer.php to the version that was included in WP 4.3.1 fixed the issue. The class itself also has a ...


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You need to override two WC templates. Create a folder woocommerce (if it doesn't already exist) under your theme's folder. From the plugins/woocommerce/templates directory copy over the files emails/plain/email-order-details.php emails/email-order-details.php and keep the same folder structure. Consult WC documentation on that one. In your versions of ...


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I found if you go to http://sitename.com/wp-admin/network/site-settings.php?id={{id}} and set it here, it doesnt require verification.


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You can only get this email and verify if there is any user have this email then change this email by the correspond username like this $login ='anything@me.com'; if(is_email( $login )){ if( email_exists( $login )) { $userID__ = email_exists($login); $user_info_kim = get_userdata($userID__); $login = ...


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When using wp_mail() WordPress calls the PHP mail() function by default, unless configured otherwise, and mail() returns true when the message was successfully accepted for delivery, but that does not tell you whether the e-mail was actually sent, it just means that whatever SMTP relay you're using on the backend (postfix, etc.) has accepted the message and ...



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