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Short Answer: No A different question is: Will uploading a large number of files in WordPress affect performance? The answer to this: Most likely not. Reason: WordPress uses the DB to get a list of uploaded files (almost no difference for many files) FTP uses the filesystem (slower for many files) Details: WordPress does not list the directory ...


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Well, does it affect site performance? If you are not noticing in actual site operation then likely not, at least at your number of files. There are performance considerations for large amounts of files. Budget hosts (which know what they are doing) typically even put in explicit limits on filesystem usage. However in WordPress operation you are not ...


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If the files are static HTML, then you only need to be concerned with name collisions for the directory structure. And if you don't have anything in WordPress that generates /demo/subfolder/ you don't have to worry about ignoring it - it's already ignored. I have a sandbox folder that I use for a similar purpose as you and haven't had to implement anything ...


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You can request WordPress to ignore the subdirectory structure by adding these rules in .htaccess. Add them within <Ifmodule mod_rewrite.c> But generally if there is no page such as demo, WordPress ignores it and the static page is rendered. RewriteCond %{REQUEST_URI} ^/Demo_directory/(.*)$


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I've had this problem because I host a few Wordpress sites on a few servers. Apache should own everything because Wordpress creates folders and files as it runs. If you want the user to make changes to Wordpress files then add the user to the group apache and change the permissions to 775.


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I may have found an answer. After completing the instructions in the Codex document, I went to the WP dashboard > Settings > General, I reset the Site Address (URL) back to example.com/wordpress. Now, the index.php file in the root directory continues to route traffic to the sub-directory and the /wordpress/index.php handles traffic directed at it. I'm a ...


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I would suggest you to use WP_Query for this purpose. An example of this query is here in this plugin which fetches only relevant posts instead of using further PHP functions. You can choose a faster way to go on, Alphabetic Pagination Plugin


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You could create a redirect in your root directory. If somebody visites the root (www.example.com) he get's redirected to the subdirectory (www.example.com/wordpress) Create a simple index.html file and place: <meta http-equiv="refresh" content="0; url=http://example.com/wordpress" /><br> Note: Place it in the head section. See: this post


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Installing Wordpress inside a sub-directory is kind of problematic. Yes, you could modify your .htaccess in order to show your Wordpress site on both the root folder and the sub-directory. However, most likely you will run intro troubles later on. Best suggestion is to move your Wordpress installation to the root folder.


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First of all, in WordPress here the best option to solve my problem is using Custom Post Types and Custom Taxonomies. To do that, I've created a file named "my_custom_posts.php" and put it inside the theme's root folder. Then I've included this file in my "functions.php" using require('my_custom_posts.php'); You can also put your custom post type ...


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Please refer to the official codex page: Moving WordPress within your site Go to Admin Panel -> Settings -> General. Change WordPress address (URI): (www.thess.com/welcome to www.thess.com) Change Site Address address (URL): (www.thess.com/welcome to www.thess.com) Move your files from subdirectory to root. That's it.



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