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10

An alternative to a "skinnable" theme framework like Carrington (which indeed is awesome) is to integrate a design you've done from scratch. This is how I learned how to create custom WordPress themes. Note: this is a hacky method that involves lots of experimentation. But if you're like me, and learn best when you're playing around with your hands, this may ...


10

The problem with custom UIs are: They look different from plugin to plugin. If you're using a customized Themeframework with integrated plugins, this could be ok. But training a customer in using a WordPress install with many different UI-approaches is definitly not easy. The reason of using WordPress as a CMS for me is simplicity. My customers aren't ...


8

Custom UI is great where it improves the experience and makes the task easier. After all, a plugin extends WordPress and therefore a lot of the time is extending the user interface. This might mean a screen that is arranged completely differently to any other screen, but if it is logical and understandable then there's no cause for confusion. Where custom ...


7

If the search field is implemented as a widget, this can be done via the administration interface. Just navigate to Appearance > Widgets and drag the search widget from the widget area to the "Available Widgets" pane. If the search field is hard-coded into the theme, it might be easier to edit the CSS rather than the HTML and PHP. Here's how: Use Firebug ...


7

Why not just ask them to estimate how much it will cost to change the layout for 600+ pages. And then ask them if they think their customer will pay for that, versus a designer using Wordpress. One important thing to point out is that Dreamweaver is a tool on your computer for creating the design. Wordpress is a CMS for maintain content. You still need ...


5

Hi @Himanshu Vyas: There are several steps to creating additional menus using the new menu system in WordPress in the TwentyTen theme or any WordPress theme (of which some of these steps can be done out of order). In addition, I'm going to highly recommend you create a child theme based on TwentyTen instead of modifying it directly: Create a Child Theme ...


4

I'm a designer who took the plunge into wordpress around a year ago. Never looked back! I got into it in a round-about way. Having coded my sites in plain HTML, I realized I needed a better solution for my clients that the available CMSs out there and WP is the ultimate CMS after all. I first started experimenting a little with PHP just including headers ...


4

I personally prefer the middle path. It should be 70% base Wordpress admin UI style (for easier integration). The other 30% can be advanced tabs, accordions, input fields to help keeping everything on one screen to avoid scrolling or make tasks like multiselect easier. Aside from that i wouldn't like to have a custom styled (colored/branded) admin ui - all ...


3

So ... I basically took the same approach, dont know if it is correct. I think many people come to this approach since it flows naturally forth out of using the settings api. I define modules (=1 admin page, so header, etc...) and each module has plugins (plugins have fields, are 1 object derived from abstract plugin class. here: ...


3

You could use a "starter" theme, such as Starkers, which provides a base for building out your own theme. There's minimal functionality in place, so you have to do some work yourself. Another option is using a theme framework, which contains a lot of common, base functionality which you can simply use. Options include Carrington and Genesis. I recommend ...


3

There are many plugins for that mostly based on shortcodes i use either Google Syntax Highlighter for WordPress http://wordpress.org/extend/plugins/google-syntax-highlighter/ SyntaxHighlighter Evolved http://wordpress.org/extend/plugins/syntaxhighlighter/


3

Theme template files are organized in this way because of the WordPress Template Hierarchy. Since all primary template files eventually fallback to index.php, it is certainly possible to use only the index.php primary template file. There are advantages and disadvantages to using either method. Generally speaking, the usefulness/efficiency of defining ...


2

You can actually use a single index.php to create your WordPress theme. all you need is a style.css and index.php (along wit footer and header) it is all up to theme developer. I did that for old style classic bloc design a lot, but today, while designing complex CMS and Magazine themes; using different files according WordPress Template Hierarchy makes ...


2

The wp_title() template tag does some context-based output. From the Codex: The title text depends on the query: Single post or a Page the title of the post (or Page) Date-based archive the date (e.g., "2006", "2006 - January") Category the name of the category Author page the public name of ...


2

I have one or two non-class scripts, mostly for forms, that I don't quite know how to neatly fit into classes. Split your project into multiple classes. Keep your worker classes as instantiable objects (typical OOP patterns) and put your non-class scripts into a class of their own as static scripts. I often use static PHP classes to namespace my code ...


2

Try this: add_menu_page(__('My Plugin', 'myplugin'),__('My Plugin', 'myplugin'), 'edit_posts','my-plugin-dashboard','my_plugin_dashboard','icon'); // dashboard submenu - this fails to highlight with current add_submenu_page('my-plugin-dashboard', __('Dashboard','myplugin'), __('Dashboard','myplugin'), 'edit_posts', 'my-plugin-dashboard', ...


2

Sounds like what you want is a Custom Page Template It's quite simple, if you want to call your layout "My Special Layout" just create a file in your Theme Directory calling it whatever you like (I'd call it "page-my-special-layout.php" but that's not required) and add the following comment to the top of the template file: <?php /* Template Name: My ...


2

I'm wondering if i should refactor my plugin using a 'private' Observer/Mediator pattern ie. collect all relevant add_actions to my parent class only and baking up a pattern to notify/forward subclasses of events, reducing the impact of my plugin to WP event ques. The event queue is fundamental to WP, so it's pretty fast and getting faster ...


2

It depends on what you call "nice" of course - it's hard to create something meaningful with an algorithm. Someone once created a unicorn-generator, which was used on April 1, 2010 all over Stack Overflow. Your unicorn looks like this:


2

Help them understand that generally speaking, designing for WordPress isn't really any harder than what they're used to. Do they use "Lorem ipsum" text as a placeholder? They'll do the same thing, except instead of "Lorem ipsum", they'll put <?php the_content();?>, and WordPress will fill that in with the real content. There's really not that much new ...


2

I think that it is a bad idea two have considerably different interfaces stuffed together. WP admin area is... work in progress (putting it politely). It is very far in structure and customization options from front-end, so for many (especially coming from theme side of things) it seems like a good idea to discard it and go custom. I think that engineering ...


2

You can try this Random from a set of images : <img src="http://www.mywebsite.com/images/image_<?php echo rand(1,10); ?>.jpg" alt="" /> This would load a random image from image_1.jpg, image_2.jpg ... to image_10.jpg or $images = array("cool_image.jpg", "nice_pic.jpg", "sunset.jpg"); $rand = array_rand($images); <img ...


2

WPMU's Q&A plugin has almost all the functionality you're looking for -- it uses HTML instead of Markdown. The admin panel lets you assign various capabilities to different roles, including the ability to edit others' questions and answers.


1

Looking at your code, this is a very very VERY bloated theme. Seriously, there's no reason a page that simple should take over 4 seconds to fully load. In addition to the "way too many nested DIV's" issue, areas above and below the header menu span the entire page, so you can't actually change just that section of the header to white background. From the ...


1

http://wordpress.org/extend/plugins/types/ This is easiest in my opinion. It's like managing custom post types but with the custom field functionality. Simply first create a group 'what we do', then add each title as a text field ( there's a button when creating groups that says 'text' just hit it 3 times and name each whatever). 'Example Work' can be your ...


1

This shouldn't be very difficult. WPs Template Hierarchy should get you started on what page loads every time. You'll probably be best maintaining minimal header.php and footer.php and working your logic on single files, named as per the Hierarchy. Then, head to add_meta_box() and update_post_meta() to implement those selectors for css and js and also ...


1

I don't develop themes, but when building a site I achieve this kind of setup you describe using the plugin Advanced Custom Fields. With it, I can hook custom meta boxes (text, image, checkboxes, dropdowns, etc) into posts, pages and CPTs, and fine tune their appearance according to page-template, categories and other conditionals. It can also hide the ...


1

I wrote a plugin named ┬╗Dynamic Image resize┬ź for exactly that purpose. It features a template tag and a shortcode (that takes the exact same amount of arguments, the template tag takes. // The args need to be an array dynamic_image_resize( array( // The full path to the image in your uploads folder 'src' => ...


1

You can use CSS attribute selectors to accomplish this without changing anything in the WP Admin or the HTML. A Google search for "css file type icons" comes up with several results, but I'll explain the basic idea for you here. An attribute selector lets you style any html tag with a matching attribute. There are many ways to use attribute selectors ...


1

There's a bit of a dirty hack, add this to your functions.php; <?php add_filter('wp_get_attachment_link', 'wpse7812_modify-attachment-link'); function wpse7812_modify-attachment-link($link) { global $post; return str_replace('<a href', '<a class="myClassName" href', $link); } ?> Where myClasssName can be whatever you want.



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