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2

It can be done and you can do a quick (relatively) job or take more time on a better site->WP conversion. I'm going to assume that you can write a theme, or this post will turn into a whole book. If not their are many guides online & in print and you don't need to become a full theme expert to get this conversion started. And we can fine tune my ...


4

WordPress has a perfect wrapper for HTML > Theme conversion: The theme itself. All information can be found in the Codex page. It is enough to add a folder to your wp-content/themes directory (or whatever directory you registered in addition to that), and add the following files functions.php style.css index.php header.php to your custom themename ...


0

Thanks for rewriting the question: It seems much clearer now. Sorry for the protracted comments earlier, but I wasnt on my laptop. I corrected a couple of typos in your code and pasted this into my functions.php: // include files via shortcode function include_file($atts) { extract(shortcode_atts(array('filepath' => NULL), $atts)); if ($...


0

When a child element has position: absolute; it will be positioned relatively to it's nearest positioned ancestor. So for example, the parent element has position: relative; then the child can be positioned using absolute and it will use the bounding box of the parent as its positional reference. In your code, try setting position: relative; for .service-...


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From version 3.1.0, WordPress decided to add a toolbar for logged in users on the display side that's about the site's theme. And add default admin bar callback before </head>: <style type="text/css" media="screen"> html { margin-top: 32px !important; } * html body { margin-top: 32px !important; } @media screen and ( max-width: ...


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You should never use relative urls in wordpress except for css files. If "pretty permalink" something that works on one page might break on another. All urls should be absolute. The most you can get with usually is being relative to the protocol, but almost never anything more then that.


-1

<div class="fill" style="background-image:url("img/image01.png");"></div> Your double quotes within double quotes will stop it from working, you need: <div class="fill" style="background-image:url('img/image01.png');"></div>


0

I have noticed in the examples you have provided, you're missing the semi colon from the end of the property you're declaring. Try adding this in, or as others have said, and !important to the end of the value. I would've commented but I need 50 rep to do so! While I'm here, I notice you're using a max-width argument. Have you considered a mobile first ...


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Try This @media only screen and (min-width: 280px) and (max-width: 767px) { .nav-transperent.logo-light{ display:none !important } }


0

Where is the fold now? to me, the fold is a little outdated, as it fully depends on the device/monitor size. It may be that JavaScript in the header of your site is blocking the page load. The best way to combat this is to simply load the JavaScript in the footer of the site instead.


0

You are using css to display none we don't need to use show() function. Please click on javascript icon in fiddle and select any jquery1.9.1 or above version . Update this code and run ( http://screenshotlink.ru/8f491216a33e437f762eb8815efec77d.png ) $(document).ready(function(){ $('.share-icon').on('click',function (e) { var id = $(this)....


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Remove styles added with wp_add_inline_style() If we want to keep the custom-style-css but only remove the custom-style-inline-css, then we can try e.g. add_action( 'wp_print_styles', function() { // Remove previous inline style wp_styles()->add_data( 'custom-style', 'after', '' ); } ); where after is data key for the inline style ...


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Looking into wp-includes/class.wp-styles.php core file I found a filter to use: add_action("print_styles_array", function( $styles ) { $my_handle = "custom-style"; // your custom handle here, the one declared as $style in question if ( !empty( $styles ) ) { foreach ( $styles as $i => $style ) { if ( $my_handle === $style ) { ...


1

It looks like the code you copied from is missing the part where your child theme styles are actually added to WordPress. It's a little strange they skipped over this, mind you! From the WordPress Codex article on child themes, you just need to modify your style enqueueing function so it includes this: wp_enqueue_style( 'child-style', ...


0

As @N00b said, if a selector matches between bootstrap and wordpress, and is more specific, then it will overwrite and you'll see the changes.


1

@nipponese is right. WordPress doesn't process Sass for themes. That was just for core files on wordpress.org.


0

This is standard WordPress functionality, contained in previous_post_link and next_post_link. You don't need to edit functions.php. Just add to your template: <div class="buttons"> <span class="previous-button"><?php previous_post_link() ?></span> <span class="next-button"><?php next_post_link() ?></span> </...


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If you care about performance then don't use Avada theme. It is total garbage when it comes to performance. The demo has 27,000 lines/5244 Rules of CSS and 2 dozen inline style sheets. In my experience a complex website with 30-40 different templates could be around 1000 rules and 5-6k lines of css. No cache plugin will save the client from a .7mb css ...


1

There are many differences in css files of both websites. For example, have a look at the div having class et-top-navigation by inspecting it in browser. You will find that in staging website, there is top padding and left padding applied while it is not in case of live website. Similarly check for other css changes in staging website or simply take backup ...



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