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Copy the file to your child theme, In your child theme, create a template and name it what ever you want, e.g content-child.php Now you can replace lib/login/register.php with your new template: <?php get_template_part( 'content-child', get_post_format() ); ?> It should work.


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I would definitely avoid using 2 different wordpress themes and instead code for a more responsive website with CSS mediaqueries. It has worked out very well for me on the Wordpress websites I created. If you're not familiar with media queries, here's a very basic rundown. HTML -- <div class="box">hello world</div> CSS -- .box { ...


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Style is not from parent CSS it is from themes/optimizer/style_core.css Then you can enqueue your child CSS on highest priority. enqueue the parent style then child style on high priority function enqueue_parent_theme_style() { wp_enqueue_style( 'parent-style', get_template_directory_uri().'/style.css' ); } add_action( 'wp_enqueue_scripts', ...


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get_template_directory() gives you the path to the parent theme while get_stylesheet_directory() gives you the path to the child theme. Docs: https://codex.wordpress.org/Function_Reference/get_stylesheet_directory https://codex.wordpress.org/Function_Reference/get_template_directory


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It seems to me that you've not declared 'lora' in your stylesheet...all I can see is lorabold, lorabold_italic, loraitalic, loraregular. So I imagine that the css is being interpreted as font-family: !important; and although I'm not 100% I'm pretty sure this is what's causing your problem. Try changing #wr-promo-title h1 {font-family: 'lora' ...


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The maximum width of an image displayed in content is not just determined by the image sizes you set or CSS settings, it is also determined by the content width set in functions.php through code similar to the following if ( ! isset( $content_width ) ) { $content_width = 960; } You need to set this to your required size as well in order for the image ...


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Did you try width:100%; in your css?


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You could do something like what Genesis child themes include to save default theme settings when activating and switching themes: //* Theme Setting Defaults add_filter( 'genesis_theme_settings_defaults', 'child_theme_defaults' ); function child_theme_defaults( $defaults ) { $defaults['blog_cat_num'] = 6; $defaults['content_archive'] ...


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Wordpress theme modifications are saved in wp_options database table in theme_mods_{themename} field. You can copy it and rename using your child theme name.


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I don't think there's a built-in safe way to do this, but you could directly modify the $wp_styles global after things are registered but before they're output, or at least use it to fetch the parameters a style was originally registered with. global $wp_styles; if( isset( $wp_styles->registered['a_stylesheet'] ) ){ ...



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