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The reason is when you execute this code setcookie('wp-postpass_' . COOKIEHASH, '', 0, COOKIEPATH); It will reset your post password cookie to blank '', so it just work once To solve this you need to assign the original cookie and extend the timeout, like this setcookie('wp-postpass_' . COOKIEHASH, $_COOKIE['wp-postpass_' . COOKIEHASH], time() + 60 * 5, ...


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Although Otto's answer is pretty good, I ended up with this in my child theme's functions.php function my_theme_styles() { global $wp_styles; $parentOriginalHandle = 'twentythirteen-style'; $parentNewHandle = 'parent-style'; // Deregister our style.css which was enqueued by the parent theme; we want // to control the versioning ourself. ...


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You don't have to use @import. It's best not to, actually. Using an enqueued approach is probably better all around. Here's the relevant part of twentythirteen's code: function twentythirteen_scripts_styles() { ... // Loads our main stylesheet. wp_enqueue_style( 'twentythirteen-style', get_stylesheet_uri(), array(), '2013-07-18' ); ... } ...


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I'm currently dealing with a site using W3TC plugin and that plugin seems to provide a custom database handler which actually caches queries to memcache. Give that a try. Sidenote: Just make sure, in case you are using multiple production servers, to use a shared memcache server and that you don't cache those queries on local memcache server (that's what my ...


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I think you're looking for the core function fetch_feed(), your new best friend! From the Codex: Retrieves an external feed and parses it. Uses the SimplePie and FeedCache functionality for retrieval and parsing and automatic caching. and fetch_feed caches results for 12 hours by default. You can modify this by modifying the time interval ...



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