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9

I've personally had limited success with the backup/restore plug-ins that are commonly available. Many times, the best backup plug-ins don't allow for a direct restoration from a backup file. So I do things manually. It's a bit more difficult, but far more reliable, too. Backing up with phpMyAdmin Log in to your host's control panel (it might be ...


9

"the boring work of backup"... Backups may be boring, but they are essential and gives you a fallback position in case things go wrong. Without backups, you're essentially playing Russian roulette with your site. It doesn't even take very long, and reverting isn't horrible or awful, it's pretty easy. WP veterans take backups, test upgrades on ...


6

I recommend rsync. It only transfers what has changed since your last rsync so subsequent updates are very fast, and it works over SSH. Sample usage in crontab: # backup rsync from example.com every morning 14 3 * * * rsync -az example.com:/var/www/example.com/htdocs/ ~/Backup/example.com/ The -a flag preserves many aspects of the original file (ie. ...


5

I've been doing this successfully with csync and an NDB cluster for years... Re other solutions: rsync works too, albeit slower. (Much, much slower; slow enough to rule out any file-based caching.) InnoDB/MyIsam master/slave works too, with HyperDB. But, you'll end up with a need to manage other stuff, namely auto-increments on write servers, if you need ...


5

There is a significant amount of memory usage if you use the $wpdb for queries that return very large result sets. $wpdb loads the entire results from any given query into memory. So if you're, say, selecting all the posts, then it'll try to load the whole thing into memory immediately. So for something like a backup plugin, direct calls to mySQL with loops ...


4

If it is an older version of WP, you need to find out what version of WP generated the database, as WP upgrades the DB most times the files are upgraded and you should incrementally upgrade to also upgrade the database. Look in the wp_options table for option 711 and see what the version is; option name will be site_transient_update_core and the value will ...


4

Updating is always important. They contain security fixes and other bug fixes. Generally update within the 3.0x considered safe. Moving between 3.x could require some changes and updates to your theme or plugins. I like to take the mantra, better safe than sorry. I would back up your database and anything your wp-content folder (plugins, uploads and ...


4

Since you guys haven't mentioned it yet then i'll have to BackWPup a free site and database backup plugin packed with features and easy to configure Database Backup WordPress XML Export Optimize Database Check\Repair Database File Backup Backups in zip,tar,tar.gz,tar.bz2 format Store backup to Folder Store backup to FTP Server Store backup to Amazon S3 ...


3

I think HTML mirror is the way to go here. There is no point keeping dynamic site that doesn't need to be. And leaving it unmaintained is not really possible on auto-pilot - even if updates are automatic there is no guarantee some plugin won't get just dropped by developer. Alternatively you can build multi-design site. It's not that hard to load ...


3

I do backups via shell (see Grep and Friends for some commands and examples). File and database backup runs within seconds even on larger sites and stuff is easy to restore. No need to worry about backups and upgrade crashes at all. In a perfect world all plugins and themes would have been already tested with the new WP version before I upgrade, well, but ...


3

I've seen a bunch of ways of doing this, but here are a couple: Use a plugin, like BackupBuddy (paid): http://pluginbuddy.com/purchase/backupbuddy/ Export your whole DB using phpMyAdmin and run a search-and-replace tool that properly deals with the serialized data, e.g. http://interconnectit.com/124/search-and-replace-for-wordpress-databases/ (I use this, ...


3

phpMyAdmin is software typically installed by your host and available via your hosting control panel, it is not part of WordPress. A search on web for [your host] phpMyAdmin will probably tell you what you need to do.


3

If you still have access to your wife's blog, I would recommend: Running a regular WordPress export of the content Downloading the entire /wp-content directory over FTP These are the two most important parts of the site - the content and the uploads. From this, you should be able to recreate the site on a clean installation by FTPing the uploads to the ...


2

It sounds like you probably need to go into the wp_options table and change the rows 'site_url' and the 'home_url' to match up with the new location. site_url is on the first page of the wp_options table, and 'home_url' is on the second page. If you can access the wp dashboard those can be changed in the 3rd and 4th text boxes on the Settings >> General ...


2

There are several back-up plugins. The simplest procedure is for the back-up to include the xml export file as then it can easily be imported into another WordPress installation. One plug-in that does this is BackWPup (http://wordpress.org/extend/plugins/backwpup/). You can set it to email you a back-up at regular intervals. It is highly customizable. ...


2

If you are not moving to a different domain name, the file path shouldn't really matter. Try these first: Made a copy of your original backup bd Open the new copy and search/replace example.com/ to example.com/blog/ This should get you going no matter what server setup you have. If it doesn't, and you already have a fresh install on the right place, ...


2

Backup Buddy is my absolute favorite. Features: db only backups full backups migration tool scheduled backups to email or remote server malware inspection http://pluginbuddy.com/purchase/backupbuddy/


2

The database still has the domain as the URL to use so it will always redirect you to the old server. The best solution is to change your hosts file. 123.456.789.0 yourdomain.com By using the NEW IP address you are forcing your computer to use the new server when going to yourdomain.com. That way you can login and do everything, making sure all is ...


2

When deleting a user, WordPress displays a warning that unless you attribute the user's posts to a new user, it's posts will be deleted and you cannot undo those deletions. That means the only way to restore the posts and media is to restore a backup of the WordPress instance or database which you hopefully have.


2

In essence: This is almost correct. Exporting/Saving your database handles all options, settings, configuration, and content. The other thing is saving all the neccessary files. In general, all you need (unless you have altered anything else) is: wp-config.php file; /wp-content folder. Just the theme is not enough, as you also might want to backup the ...


2

I believe the wordpress URL and site URl are not set right. Please try to edit your wp-config.php adding these lines: define('WP_HOME','http://example.com'); define('WP_SITEURL','http://example.com'); Is your index on same folder as wp installation? if not, you need to place it there. I'm talking about placing the URL in the above lines, not the index on ...


2

Another way to seamlessly switch from localhost to live (for MS Windows): install WP on the live site. from your site control panel download a database copy and a site back-up of your files, and copy them to your localhost (for eg C:/wamp/www/) and import the db in your phpmyadmin; it's better to do this the other way around to make sure your live site ...


2

The codex covers this topic VERY thoroughly. Personally, I use WP-DB-Backup, it's the most popular backup plugin that I know of, and it's really easy to use.


2

You can use a plugin like backwpup that lets you: Store backup to Folder Store backup to FTP Server Store backup to Amazon S3 Store backup to Google Storage Store backup to Microsoft Azure (Blob) Store backup to RackSpaceCloud Store backup to DropBox (free) Store backup to SugarSync (free) and manage the number of backup copies to store which means for ...


2

I would start by reading the sections in the Codex on WordPress Backups, Backing Up Your Database, and Restoring Your Database From Backup, to get a good understanding of the issues involved. There are a number of plugins written to automate the database backup process. Due to your webhost issue, you may have to just try a few to find one that works. I ...


1

There are several commercial backup options, as well. Backupify, BackupBuddy and VaultPress spring readily to mind.


1

If your webhost has cPanel, you might check there for a section on backup/restore. Two of my hosts have very easy to use tools, to do full or partial BU or restore, accessible through cPanel. Granted, these are not automated or incremental, but perhaps useful to you, nonetheless. Forgive me if you already know this, but the DB alone is not enough; you'll ...


1

Not a database backup per se, but you can export the contents of your site to a WXR file (XML format) and restore it on another installation. It's a bit simpler, and doesn't require access to your MySQL server or PhpMyAdmin. You do get options for what to export and what to import. This functionality can be found in Import and Export under the Tools menu in ...


1

As you probably know, there could be a number of reasons your FTP connection is slow. For the purpose of answering this question I am going to assume that you either have a huge amount of files, or either you or your web host has a very slow internet connection. Personally, when I am dealing with a large number of files I tend to compress the files ...


1

If you're using the WP-DB Manager plugin, go into its options and create a backup manually. If this fails, inspect the error message and try to figure out what might be going wrong. If you can't figure it out, post the error message here. If the manual backup goes fine, there's probably an error with the e-mail setup. Check all the e-mail settings and ...



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