Take the 2-minute tour ×
WordPress Development Stack Exchange is a question and answer site for WordPress developers and administrators. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'm using wp_list_categories(); to show a list of all the terms within a custom taxonomy but I need to style list items that have children differently to those that don't.

Is there a way, PHP or jQuery, that I can give all parent elements a special class?

share|improve this question
add comment

1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

jQuery solution:

You could try this if you want to use jQuery:

<script>
jQuery(document).ready(function($) {
    $('li.cat-item:has(ul.children)').addClass('i-have-kids');
}); 
</script>

to add the class i-have-kids to all the li parents that include the items ul.children, within the HTML generated from wp_list_categories().

Category walker solution:

You could take a look at the Walker_Category class in /wp-includes/category-template.php and extend it with an extra part like:

$termchildren = get_term_children( $category->term_id, $category->taxonomy );
if(count($termchildren)>0){
    $class .=  ' i-have-kids';
}

If we skip the feed image and feed parts, the extended walker could look like this:

class Walker_Category_Find_Parents extends Walker_Category {
    function start_el( &$output, $category, $depth = 0, $args = array(), $id = 0 ) {
        extract($args);

        $cat_name = esc_attr( $category->name );
        $cat_name = apply_filters( 'list_cats', $cat_name, $category );
        $link = '<a href="' . esc_url( get_term_link($category) ) . '" ';
        if ( $use_desc_for_title == 0 || empty($category->description) )
            $link .= 'title="' . esc_attr( sprintf(__( 'View all posts filed under %s' ), $cat_name) ) . '"';
        else
            $link .= 'title="' . esc_attr( strip_tags( apply_filters( 'category_description', $category->description, $category ) ) ) . '"';
            $link .= '>';
            $link .= $cat_name . '</a>';

        if ( !empty($show_count) )
            $link .= ' (' . intval($category->count) . ')';

                if ( 'list' == $args['style'] ) {
                        $output .= "\t<li";
                        $class = 'cat-item cat-item-' . $category->term_id;

                        $termchildren = get_term_children( $category->term_id, $category->taxonomy );
                        if(count($termchildren)>0){
                            $class .=  ' i-have-kids';
                        }

                        if ( !empty($current_category) ) {
                                $_current_category = get_term( $current_category, $category->taxonomy );
                                if ( $category->term_id == $current_category )
                                        $class .=  ' current-cat';
                                elseif ( $category->term_id == $_current_category->parent )
                                        $class .=  ' current-cat-parent';
                        }
                        $output .=  ' class="' . $class . '"';
                        $output .= ">$link\n";
                } else {
                        $output .= "\t$link<br />\n";
                }
        }
    }

You could further take out the parts that you don't need.

Usage example:

<?php 
$args = array(
  'taxonomy'     => 'my_custom_taxonomy_slug',
  'orderby'      => 'name',
  'hide_empty'   => 0,
  'title_li'     => '',
  'hierarchical' => 1,
  'walker'       => new Walker_Category_Find_Parents(),
);
?>
<ul class="menu">
   <?php wp_list_categories( $args ); ?>
</ul>

Output example:

Here's a list example, using the Walker_Category_Find_Parents walker:

List example

with the following HTML structure:

<ul class="menu">
    <li class="cat-item cat-item-1">
        <a href="http://example.com/category/plants/">plants</a>
    </li>
    <li class="cat-item cat-item-2 i-have-kids">
        <a href="http://example.com/category/animals/">animals</a>
        <ul class="children">
            <li class="cat-item cat-item-3 i-have-kids">
                <a href="http://example.com/category/animals/birds/">birds</a>
                <ul class="children">
                    <li class="cat-item cat-item-4">
                        <a href="http://example.com/category/animals/birds/falcons/">falcons</a>
                    </li>
                </ul>
            </li>
        </ul>
    </li>
    <li class="cat-item cat-item-5">
        <a href="http://example.com/category/stones">stones</a>
    </li>
</ul>

I just removed the title attributes to make it more readable.

But you can see where the i-have-kids class is added to the li tags with children.

When I visit the / Animals / Birds / category, the HTML structure becomes:

<ul class="menu">
    <li class="cat-item cat-item-1">
        <a href="http://example.com/category/plants/">plants</a>
    </li>
    <li class="cat-item cat-item-2 i-have-kids current-cat-parent">
        <a href="http://example.com/category/animals/">animals</a>
        <ul class="children">
            <li class="cat-item cat-item-3 i-have-kids current-cat">
                <a href="http://example.com/category/animals/birds/">birds</a>
                <ul class="children">
                    <li class="cat-item cat-item-4">
                        <a href="http://example.com/category/animals/birds/falcons/">falcons</a>
                    </li>
                </ul>
            </li>
        </ul>
    </li>
    <li class="cat-item cat-item-5">
        <a href="http://example.com/category/stones">stones</a>
    </li>
</ul>
share|improve this answer
    
Nice! :-) One thing though. The top-level LI doesn't get the current-cat-parent class. Do you know why? –  Kenneth B May 2 at 9:09
    
Hej @KennethB, the current-cat-parent class displays on the top level li tag, on my 3.9.1 install with the default theme. I updated the answer to show you the HTML structure. –  birgire May 9 at 18:04
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.