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I'm looking for a plugin/custom function that removes the parent slug of a child's page permalink.

Something that automatically changes the permalink for child pages.

Example: www.blog.com/products/apple becomes www.blog.com/apple Anyone got a clue if that could be done?

Thanks in advance

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@fdsa Doesn't work automatically, does it? –  INT Jun 24 '12 at 21:37
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You shouldn't do this - it will break WordPress' url conflict checking, so you can get conflicts. But if you don't want page hierarchy in URLs, why are you building this hierarchy? –  Krzysiek Dróżdż Jul 26 '13 at 13:22

2 Answers 2

I'm not sure if you guys are still looking for a solution for this, but I found the perfect one: http://wordpress.org/extend/plugins/custom-permalinks/

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I don't think it does it automatically though.. –  INT Dec 7 '12 at 12:50

You may not like this answer, but it's a quite simple, and probably most recommended. Don't set these pages as child pages.

There are numerous ways of getting pages to list out in a child-like order - WP Menus.

Use that instead, and you will cause less stress on your WordPress installation - having to set and forget things is much worst than setting them somewhere else.

The only downside would be organization in the back end, but you can either customize the List Table, or create a custom post type to hold all your products in their own area.

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far from a reasonable answer when working on client sites. A personal site? Sure. We know how to maintain the menu structure when setting up custom pages, but when the client changes a page title or something their menu will be all screwed up, and what do you know it's the developers fault. –  EHerman Jun 5 at 14:35
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This is a best practice approach, not a "What makes my job easier" approach. If you don't take the time to document and train your client on how to approach the maintenance of their site, you deserve the "Things are broken" phone calls that you're getting. –  Eric Holmes Jun 5 at 16:52
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I haven't been getting those phone calls because I try and do things consistently between client projects. I was just making a blanket statement for anyone who decides to go that route so they are aware of any future issues that may arise. –  EHerman Jun 5 at 20:01

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