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First of all, I can't use Trac, which is what the WP dev community uses to track bugs. However, my consulting company is using WordPress as a CMS for just about everything - product information, sales portal, news site, etc. I'd like to set it up to integrate our plug-in listing with a bug tracker ...

Right now, I have Flyspray set up as a standalone bug tracker. It works alright, but it's a separate domain (http://bt.jumping-duck.com) so that it remains separate from WordPress. But I'd like to be able to pull in numbers of tickets onto the WP page listing our plug-ins. Ideally, users could also submit bug reports directly from the plug-in info page.

Does anyone have any experience integrating WP with a bug tracking system like this? Should I stick with keeping the two systems separate?

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4 Answers 4

up vote 3 down vote accepted

I don't see any reason not to make WordPress into a bug tracker. Essentially, tickets would be a non-hierarchical custom post type which would have several taxonomies, such as priority, status, etc.

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That might be the way to go, give both custom post types and custom taxonomies ... do you know of any frameworks that exist already? Preferably a drop-in plug-in ... it would save me the work :-) –  EAMann Aug 12 '10 at 20:58
    
I don't know of anything off the top of my head; I know the plugin 'Pods CMS' (wordpress.org/extend/plugins/pods) was a precursor to WP3.0's custom post types, although I have to confess I've never used the plugin, so I can't really say how well it works for what you'd need. –  John P Bloch Aug 12 '10 at 21:12
    
@John P Bloch Reinventing the wheel is normally considered stupid, and seen as a reason not to do so. Choose the right tool for the job, separate applications to reduce complexity. –  hakre Sep 5 '10 at 8:26
    
@hakre Except using WordPress as a bug tracker is neither stupid nor reinventing the wheel. Spencer Finnell created a theme (Quality Control - spencerfinnell.com/quality-control-theme ) that turns WordPress into a bug tracker. I have it running on bugs.johnpbloch.com. As someone who looked into various bug trackers before Spencer's theme came out, I can't say WordPress isn't the right tool. If you need integration w/ version control, WP isn't right. But if you just need the bug tracker, I see no reason not to use it. –  John P Bloch Sep 6 '10 at 14:26
    
@John P Bloch True. As always it depends on the specific needs. Just see my comment to evaluate the boundaries. –  hakre Sep 6 '10 at 21:17
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The Custom Post Types UI plugin might be a good start as far as getting all of the post types and taxonomies setup.

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i think also, the best way for bugtracker-content and different from posts. You can also create best backend for this post_type and many different frontend-views via template and wp_query(). –  bueltge Aug 13 '10 at 18:44
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Hey I think this may be what you're looking for. It's a free WordPress theme called Quality Control Theme for ticket tracking. From there you can customize it however you want.

http://spencerfinnell.com/quality-control-theme/

This option will be the least amount of work for you because the framework is already there.

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Maybe something like this "Advanced Ticket System" plugin?

http://wordpress.org/extend/plugins/wats/

Only catch is that the current free version isn't WP3.x copatible, you have to donate to get that version. I have been looking for something similiar too.

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